Chapter XX     Areas where Global Parliament may take coordinating, complementary or supporting action

Chapter 20.1     Public health
Article 1:   
1.     A high level of human health protection shall be ensured in the definition and implementation of all Global Parliament's policies and activities. Action by Global Parliament, which shall complement national policies, shall be directed towards improving public health, preventing human illness and diseases, and obviating sources of danger to physical and mental health. Such action shall cover the fight against the major health scourges, by promoting research into their causes, their transmission and their prevention, as well as health information and education. Global Parliament shall complement Member Nations' action in reducing drugs-related health damage, including information and prevention.
2.     Global Parliament shall encourage cooperation between Member Nations in the areas referred to in this Article and, if necessary, lend support to their action. Member Nations shall, in liaison with the Global Judiciary , coordinate among themselves their policies and programmes in the areas referred to in paragraph 1. The Global Judiciary may, in close contact with Member Nations, take any useful initiative to promote such coordination, in particular initiatives aiming at the establishment of guidelines and indicators, the organisation of exchange of best practice, and the preparation of the necessary elements for periodic monitoring and evaluation. The Global Parliament shall be kept fully informed.
3.     Global Parliament and Member Nations shall foster cooperation with third countries and the competent international organisations in the sphere of public health.
4.     Global law or framework laws shall contribute to the achievement of the objectives referred to in this Article by establishing the following measures in order to meet common safety concerns:   
(a)    measures setting high standards of quality and safety of organs and substances of human origin, blood and blood derivatives; these measures shall not prevent any Member Nation from maintaining or introducing more stringent protective measures;
(b)    measures in the veterinary and phytosanitary fields which have as their direct objective the protection of public health; Global law or framework laws shall be adopted after consultation of the Committee of the Regions and the Economic and Social Committee.
5.     Global law or framework laws may also establish incentive measures designed to protect and improve human health and to combat the major cross-border health scourges, excluding any harmonisation of the laws and regulations of Member Nations. It shall be adopted after consultation of the Committee of the Regions and the Economic and Social Committee.
6.     For the purposes set out in this Article, the Earth Executive Council, on a proposal from the Global Judiciary, may also adopt recommendations.
7.     Global Parliament action in the field of public health shall fully respect the responsibilities of Member Nations for the organisation and delivery of health services and medical care. In particular, measures referred to in paragraph 4(a) shall not affect national provisions on the donation or medical use of organs and blood.

Chapter 20.2     Industry sector
Article 1:   
1.     Global Parliament and Member Nations shall ensure that the conditions necessary for the competitiveness of Global Parliament's industry exist. For that purpose, in accordance with a system of open and competitive markets, their action shall be aimed at:   
(a)    speeding up the adjustment of industry to structural changes;
(b)    encouraging an environment favourable to initiative and to the development of undertakings throughout Global Parliament, particularly small and medium-sized undertakings;
(c)    encouraging an environment favourable to cooperation between undertakings;
(d)    fostering better exploitation of the industrial potential of policies of innovation, research and technological development.
2.     Member Nations shall consult each other in liaison with the Global Judiciary and, where necessary, shall coordinate their action. The Global Judiciary may take any useful initiative to promote such coordination, in particular initiatives aiming at the establishment of guidelines and indicators, the organisation of exchange of best practice, and the preparation of the necessary elements for periodic monitoring and evaluation. Global Parliament shall be kept fully informed.
3.     Global Parliament shall contribute to the achievement of the objectives set out in paragraph 1 through the policies and activities it pursues under other provisions of the Constitution. Global law or framework laws may establish specific measures in support of action taken in Member Nations to achieve the objectives set out in paragraph 1, excluding any harmonisation of the laws and regulations of Member Nations. They shall be adopted after consultation of the Economic and Social Committee. This Section shall not provide a basis for the introduction by Global Parliament of any measure which could lead to distortion of competition or contains tax provisions or provisions relating to the rights and interests of employed persons.

Chapter 20.3     Culture
Article 1:   
1.     Global Parliament shall contribute to the flowering of the cultures of Member Nations, while respecting their national and regional diversity and at the same time bringing the common cultural heritage to the fore.
2.     Action by Global Parliament shall be aimed at encouraging cooperation between Member Nations and, if necessary, supporting and complementing their action in the following areas:   
(a)    improvement of the knowledge and dissemination of the culture and history of the Peoples;
(b)    conservation and safeguarding of cultural heritage of global significance;
(c)    non-commercial cultural exchanges;
(d)    artistic and literary creation, including in the audiovisual sector.
3.     Global Parliament and Member Nations shall foster cooperation with third countries and the competent international organisations in the sphere of culture, in particular the Council of all Nations.
4.     Global Parliament shall take cultural aspects into account in its action under other provisions of the Constitution, in particular in order to respect and to promote the diversity of its cultures.
5.     In order to contribute to the achievement of the objectives referred to in this
(a)    Global law or framework laws shall establish incentive actions, excluding any harmonisation of the laws and regulations of Member Nations. They shall be adopted after consultation of the Committee of the Regions;
(b)    the Earth Executive Council, on a proposal from the Global Judiciary , shall adopt recommendations.

Chapter 20.4     Education, vocational training, youth and sport
Article 1:   
1.     Global Parliament shall contribute to the development of quality education by encouraging cooperation between Member Nations and, if necessary, by supporting and complementing their action. It shall fully respect the responsibility of Member Nations for the content of teaching and the organisation of education systems and their cultural and linguistic diversity. The Earth Government shall contribute to the promotion of global sporting issues, given the social and educational function of sport.
2.     Global Parliament action shall be aimed at:   
(a)    developing the global dimension in education, particularly through the teaching and dissemination of the languages of Member Nations;
(b)    encouraging mobility of students and teachers, inter alia by encouraging the academic recognition of diplomas and periods of study;
(c)    promoting cooperation between educational establishments;
(d) developing exchanges of information and experience on issues common to the education systems of Member Nations;
(e)    encouraging the development of youth exchanges and of exchanges of socio-educational instructors and encouraging the participation of young people in democratic life in all Nations.
(f)    encouraging the development of distance education;
(g)    developing the global dimension in sport, by promoting fairness in competitions and cooperation between sporting bodies and by protecting the physical and moral integrity of sportsmen and sportswomen, especially young sportsmen and sportswomen.
3.     Global Parliament and Member Nations shall foster cooperation with third countries and the competent international organisations in the field of education, in particular the Council of all Nations.
4.     In order to contribute to the achievement of the objectives referred to in this Article,
(a)    Global law or framework laws shall establish incentive actions, excluding any harmonisation of the laws and regulations of Member Nations. They shall be adopted after consultation of the Committee of the Regions and the Economic and Social Committee.
(b)    the Earth Executive Council, on a proposal from the Global Judiciary , shall adopt recommendations.
Article 2:   
1.     Global Parliament shall implement a vocational training policy which shall support and complement the action of Member Nations, while fully respecting the responsibility of Member Nations for the content and organisation of vocational training.
2.     Global Parliament action shall aim to:   
(a)    facilitate adaptation to industrial change, in particular through vocational training and retraining;
(b)    improve initial and continuing vocational training in order to facilitate vocational integration and reintegration into the labour market;
(c)    facilitate access to vocational training and encourage mobility of instructors and trainees and particularly young people;
(d)    stimulate cooperation on training between educational or training establishments and firms;
(e)    develop exchanges of information and experience on issues common to the training systems of Member Nations.
3.     Global Parliament and Member Nations shall foster cooperation with third countries and the competent international organisations in the sphere of vocational training.
4.     Global law or framework laws shall contribute to the achievement of the objectives referred to in this Article, excluding any harmonisation of the laws and regulations of Member Nations. They shall be adopted after consultation of the Committee of the Regions and the Economic and Social Committee.

Chapter 20.5     Civil protection, emergencies and rescues
Article 1:   
1.     Global Parliament shall encourage cooperation between Member Nations in order to improve the effectiveness of systems for preventing and protecting against natural or man-made disasters within Global Parliament. Earth Government action shall aim to:   
a)    support and complement Member Nations' action at national, regional and local level in risk prevention, in preparing their civil-protection personnel and in responding to natural or man-made disasters;
(b)    promote swift, effective operational cooperation between national civil-protection services;
(c)    promote consistency in international civil-protection work.
2.     The measures necessary to help achieve the objectives referred to in paragraph 1 shall be enacted in Global law or framework laws, excluding any harmonisation of the laws and regulations of Member Nations.

Article 2:    Connecting with Nature for our species survival
A question such as, "Do we need Nature?" leads me to contemplate which components of life’s sustaining machinery we could possibly live without. Nature herself fills our lungs. She processes and sorts nutrients taken in from the air, and sends them through my veins so that thoughts may take shape. Believe what we will, we are not capable of living beyond Nature’s subtle influences. She controls the wondrous complexities of the very life forces that sustain us and allow us our thoughts. Being obsessed with sustainability’s enormous market potential, the impact of our society’s disconnection from Nature both concerns and intrigues us. The thought of tearing up as much as 96% of each dollar and sending it to a landfill is inconceivable. And yet when money is in the form of products made from toxic-laced non-recyclable or non-reusable materials, and society pays the costs hidden over time, that is inadvertently what does happen.

Millions of people are employed within thousands of industries that ultimately manufacture waste in various forms. Every process at each individual stage of producing all of these products reduces, if not wastes, a myriad of raw materials that Nature has taken hundreds, and even millions of years to make available. For future generations’ sake, a greater accounting of human activities is direly needed. We must begin to put all our collective efforts towards creating a ‘restorative economy’ specifically intended to generate social and environmental profits – as well as financial profits. When we speak lightly of Nature, our thoughts might wander through the colorful beauty of wind-caressed meadows, or along the pristine shores of sun kissed mountain stream-fed lakes, the sun dancing lightly about the fluid surfaces.

Even now those tranquil images lull my restless soul to further reflect upon Nature’s physical beauties. Many are the times of our lives that we have found peace and sanity within Nature’s orchestrated symphonies. Looking at this vast, unnatural, modern cityscape, we wonder for how much longer our natural systems could continue feeding civilization’s insatiable hungers for comfort, convenience and luxury. Our thoughts turned to all the stores packed with endless aisles of countless consumables. We struggle to grasp the enormous amounts of natural resources and human activity their production required. We feel that we have to possess it if it pleases our senses, amuses or entertains, is this season’s fashionable style or colour, organizes our stressful lives, or makes our days more convenient. For how much longer, we wonder, might the whole of humankind escape the consequences of our crippling Nature’s ability to sustain life?

We turned away from our unsustainable, consumer-driven society toward a current need for ensuring that our great-grandchildren’s generation will have the wherewithal to meet their basic needs around the year 2040. This urgent global quest for sustainability challenges people within every municipality and region to see and begin to create their world anew. Dwindling regional prosperity could be renewed by focusing in on our current needs for healthy, vibrant and productive communities. Sustainability’s greatest challenge however, is in re-establishing our place within Nature’s chaotic complexities.

The last two decades have witnessed the birth of new sciences intended to gain insights into the complex workings of ‘whole systems’. Over the course of history, sciences have evolved in isolation of each other. The emerging result is that we are losing sight of the interconnections that inextricably link them all into this concept we have always called ‘Nature’.

Unpredictable weather patterns of endless destructive storms, floods and droughts, raging forest fires, and landscape-altering earthquakes may just be Gaia’s attempts at ridding herself of our viral attacks upon her overall well-being. It is we who must begin to yield to Nature, as Nature will never yield to us. While we as a species have evolved to the point of creative thought, technological invention and great engineering prowess enabling us to fashion some forms of control over our surroundings, we have yet to discover the means to produce something out of nothing. The suggestion of settling on other planets, or harvesting natural resources from even the nearest of worlds, remains the reality of vivid imagination. Until such time that we succeed at realizing any one of these aspirations, we will still have to depend on increasingly scant resources that have taken Nature a galactic lifespan to generate.

Just one breath taken in over the course of an average lifetime endures in time far beyond that of humankind’s entire existence within a galactic lifespan. Within some extremely short timeline of that breath, industrialization has harvested and converted the vast majority of Nature’s resources into useless, even life threatening, waste. As we persist in recklessly designing and consuming products that challenge the very laws of Nature, we continue to limit the means of survival for each successive generation yet to be born. Will Nature afford us the time needed to restore her capabilities of sustaining life so that we might survive long enough to take in one last galactic breath? Discovering the secrets of complexity may well equal the challenge of proving the existence of God. By all accounts we may have left to us barely enough time to concentrate our efforts on adapting ourselves to Nature’s complexity. Viewed through historical prisms, we stand today at crossroads not unlike those which our ancestors faced. Beginning with the late nineteenth-century, the industrialization of horseless carriages altered the nature of life, work and travel. A hundred years later, over the course of the industrial age, life, work and travel have altered Nature herself. That brings back into perspective a restorative economy’s market potential for ensuring our survival within the 21st Century.

Barely has the international sustainability movement begun, and a most provocative realization is stimulating some rather intriguing, multifaceted solutions. People are beginning to ask, "What is it that needs to be sustained, given the social, economic and environmental threats to our communities, and residents?"

After assessing the life threatening results of the last industrial revolution, the Next Industrial Revolution’s leaders, are successfully enticing industrialists to embrace Nature’s mentorship. Toxic-free materials used in creating new products are currently being designed such that they will become either the quality raw materials for future products or will decompose into safe, healthy nutrients for Nature’s use. Wholistic building designs are awarded for their innate ability to integrate with, and even restore, their environments. And so, in the Next Industrial Revolution consumerism need not end but inherit complete respect for Nature, integrating smoothly with those complex ecosystems we need in order to perpetuate our species on this planet.

Nature is what seems to have set this planet apart from any others we know. Whether by divine intent or by some abnormal happenstance, life thrives within, upon and above our Earth’s surfaces. Species come, and species go. If we homo sapiens value our continued existence, we will admit to our needing Nature and re-establish our connections with her. That is what will lie at the heart of our arduous struggle to achieve sustainability.

Chapter 20.6     Global Administration
Article 1:   
1.     Effective national implementation of Global Parliament law by Member Nations, which is essential for the proper functioning of Global Parliament, shall be regarded as a matter of common interest.
2.     Global Parliament may support the efforts of Member Nations to improve their administrative capacity to implement Global Parliament law. Such action may include facilitation of exchange of information and of civil servants as well as supporting training schemes. No Member Nation shall be obliged to avail itself of such support. Global laws shall establish the necessary measures to this end, excluding any harmonisation of the laws and regulations of Member Nations.
3.     This Article shall be without prejudice to the obligations of the Member Nations to implement Global Parliament law or to the prerogatives and duties of the Global Judiciary . It shall also be without prejudice to other provisions of the Constitution providing for administrative cooperation among Member Nations and between them and Global Parliament.

Chapter 20.7     Celebration of Life Day
Article 1:    Celebration of Life Day

On May 26, as part of the Peace Movement of the Global Community, the Human Family, global citizens were rejoicing with all Peoples of the world , and all life, for the annual Celebration of Life Day. Life is the most precious gift ever given by God to the universe and this event needs to be celebrated.

At the early stage of the formation of the Earth, and a while later, all the conditions for the formation of life were present, and life was created to better serve God. Life was made of matter and every particle of that matter had a Soul that merged with all the others. A Soul is a part of the Spirit of God, His consciousness, and is a living, loving presence, a Being. A Soul can merge with other Souls and become one Soul, and it can evolve as well. The first spark of life was the cause for the formation of a unique and independent Soul to better serve God. Throughout the different evolutionary stages of life on Earth, Souls have guided the step-by-step evolution of life and kept merging with one another to better serve God. They guided the evolutionary process in small, incremental ways over a period of several billion years. Many groupings of Souls became more complex than others as they were much brighter beings than other groupings, but all serve God in their own special way.

One unique and most wonderful grouping was the grouping that made the Human Soul. God loves the human Souls a lot because of their wonderful qualities. Over the past thousands of years, through their Souls human beings became conscious of God in many different ways. Religions of all kinds started to spread on Earth to adore God and pray. Different groupings of Souls affected human beings in different ways and Peoples today have different religious beliefs. God is like a river feeding plentifully and bountifully all lifeforms and plants. There are many pathways leading to the river. They are God's pathways. God loves diversity in Nature and in Souls. God loves good Souls from all religions.

Different religions have different ways to love, adore and pray to God. And God's Heaven exists. Heaven on Earth is different from God's Heaven. To be in Heaven with God will mean a Soul has left the matter of the universe forever to enter God's Heaven.

The Divine Will or Will of God is the most powerful force of the universe and is pure spiritual energy. The Will of God is for life to reach God, God’s Pure Light, in the best possible ways. Life is the building block through which Souls can have a meaningful relationship with God. By observing the Universe, the galaxies, we are observing and studying God. We are seeing His magnificence, His greatness, and His complex making. There is more to the Universe we observe today, that is, there is more to God, much more. God is self-existent, eternal and infinite in space and time. Follow God's Word. God's Plan was revealed to humanity a short while ago. The Divine Plan for humanity is:

a) for everyone to manage Earth responsibly, and
b) about to reach the stars and spread Life throughout the universe and thus help other Souls to evolve and serve God in the best possible ways.

Humanity’s higher purpose is to serve God by propagating life throughout the universe. Humanity will evolve spiritually to fulfill God's Plan. The human species has reached a point in its evolution where it knows its survival is being challenged. The human species knows through the Souls and now that all human Souls have merged together and formed the Soul of Humanity, we will find it easier to fight for our own survival. The Soul of Humanity does not make decisions for us and can only help us understand and guide us on the way. In the past, human beings have had some kind of symbiotical relationship (which is something common in Nature between lifeforms in an ecosystem) with the Souls, and now with the Soul of Humanity. We work together for both our survival and well-being. Cooperation and symbiosis between lifeforms (especially human beings) on Earth and between lifeforms and their Souls and the Soul of Humanity have become a necessity of life. We help one another, joint forces, and accomplish together what we cannot accomplish separately. Several billion years ago this symbiosis between matter and Souls resulted in the making of complex biochemical systems. Symbiosis has worked throughout the evolution of life on Earth and today, the Soul of Humanity has decided to be more active with humanity by purifying Souls. The Soul of Humanity shows us the way to better serve God.

The Soul of Humanity is helping to bring about the event of Peace in the world. Knowing that Earth is a spiritual entity as well as a physical entity in space and time in the universe we begin to have a better relationship with Earth and with all its living inhabitants. This way Earth management will become a spiritual and a natural process whereby each person is responsible and accountable for its management the best they can. Peace in the world and Earth management have for too long been in the hands of and affected by government and business leaders, in the hands of a few people on the planet, as opposed to being in the hands of all of us (6.157 billion people on Earth) working together to keep our planet healthy. We are the keepers of the Earth.

The Soul of Humanity will help us:

* resolve problems, concerns and issues peacefully;
* reinstate the respect for Earth;
* work with humanity to keep Earth healthy, productive and hospitable for all people and living things;
* bring forth a sustainable global society embracing universal values related to global rights, economic and social justice; respect of nature, peace, responsibility to one another;
* protect the global life-support systems and manage Earth;
* evolve spiritually to fulfill God’s Plan; and
* enter God’s Heaven, His Spirit, His Pure Light, His universal mind and consciousness.


We have the responsibility of managing Earth. Everyone shares responsibility for the present and future well-being of life within Earth Community. When there is a need to find a solution to a problem or a concern, a sound solution would be to choose a measure or conduct an action, if possible, which causes reversible damage as oppose to a measure or an action causing an irreversible loss.

Life exists on millions of other planets in the universe and our species got to be who we are today through the evolutionary process. Other lifeforms in the universe may have evolved to be at least as advanced as our species. Their Souls may even be more complicated than ours. They may have merged a trillion times more than the human Souls. They may have evolved as well.

We the Peoples of the Global Community, the Human Family, are reaffirming faith in the fundamental global rights, in the dignity and worth of the human person, in the equal rights of men and women and of nations large and small. We the Peoples implies every individual on Earth, every community and every nation. Earth management is now a priority and a duty of every responsible person on Earth. The Global Community has taken action by calling the Divine Will into our lives and following its guidance. Divine Will is now a part of the Soul of Humanity to be used for the higher purpose of good and life's evolution. We will learn to serve humanity and radiate the Will of God to others.

As never before in history, common destiny beckons us to seek a new beginning. This requires a change of mind and heart, and calling Divine Will to come into our life to show us the way. It requires a new sense of global interdependence and universal responsibility. We must develop and apply the vision of a sustainable way of life locally, nationally, regionally, globally, and within ourselves throughout life. Our cultural diversity is a precious heritage and different cultures will find their own distinctive ways to realize the vision. We must deepen and expand the global dialogue that generated the ongoing collaborative search for truth and wisdom.

Life often involves tensions between important values. This can mean difficult choices. However, we must find ways to harmonize diversity with unity, the exercise of freedom with the common good, short-term objectives with long-term goals. Every individual, family, organization, and community has a vital role to play. The arts, sciences, religions, educational institutions, media, businesses, nongovernmental organizations, and governments are all called to offer creative leadership. The partnership of government, civil society, and business is essential for an effective global governance based on global concepts and the Scale of Human and Earth Rights.

In order to build a sustainable global community, each individual, each local community, and national governments of the world must initiate their commitment to the Global Community.

Let our time be a time remembered for the awakening of a new reverence for life, the firm resolve to achieve sustainability, the quickening of the struggle for justice and peace, and the joyful celebration of life. Let our expanding consciousness blend with that of the Soul of Humanity.
Chapter 20.8     Earth flag
Article 1:    A campaign to design the Earth flag
A campaign to design the Earth flag for the Global Community is going on right now and I call upon and encourage students from all over the planet to participate in the design of the Earth flag. It will be their first unified achievement. Children's education is also part of the theme for this global dialogue. There is a need to train the next generation in the skills of collaborating in the future management of global change, which will be vital to survival. Students of all levels (school, college, technical, university) are invited to participate in Earth Community projects. They are asked to produce any creative work of their vision of what the Global Community can accomplish ~ in the fields of zoology, biology, on history, on geography, on social and political sciences, on agriculture, energy, earth sciences, forestry, communications, wilderness, pollution, on the water supplies of the world, poverty, employment, social justice, human rights, universal values, global concepts, business and economy, availability of resources and so on.

Have you contacted a school or any other educational institution in your community to encourage participation? Have you let parents, students and teachers (instructors, professors, etc) know of the campaign?

Chapter 20.9     The ECO Award
Article 1:    Criteria to obtain the ECO Award
Welcome to the official site of the ECO Award offered by the ECO Award Committee of the Earth Community Organization (ECO), the Global Community. Who is eligible for the ECO award?
Although the Criteria to obtain the ECO Award varies according to the categories, the basic requirement is the same for all candidates: only Global Community citizens can be nominated.
To be considered eligible for an award it is necessary to be nominated in writing by a person competent to make such a nomination. Then the candidate must go througth the process of obtaining the award, the selection process.
Article 2:    Categories of the ECO Awards
The ECO Award is an international award given yearly for achievements in several categories.
Article 3:    ECO Award in the business category
The ECO Award in the business category Certified Corporate Global Community Citizenship

The ECO Award in the business category was the very first award given in 2004 by the ECO Award Committee of the Global Community. It was the first award ever given by the Committee.
The ECO Award Committee has decided to award the ECO Award in the business category for 2004 to Germain Dufour, Global Community WebNet Ltd., for his contribution to:

*    a sustainable Global Community development,
*    the development of the CCGCC,
*    democracy, and
*    peace.
Chapter 20.10     Portal of the Global Community
Article 1:    Portal of the Global Community
Portal of Global Parliament
The original and best Global Community portal - with search engine, links to sites and news, press releases, letters, reports, action alert, educational and training programs, scientific evaluations, business assesments and support, workshops and global dialogues and more!
  • Portal of the Global Community (original Portal from back in 1985) Portal of the Global Community
  • Global Constitution Global Constitution
  • The Federation of Global Governments vs the United Nations
  • Annual meeting of the Federation of Global Governments
  • A just, fair and most needed Global Government
  • Federation of Global Governments Head Quarters (HQ) Federation of Global Governments Head Quarters Federation of Global Governments
  • Essential services Main index the Global Movement to Help essential services   Essential services
  • Global Justice Network Global Justice Network  Global Justice Network
  • Global Protection Agency (GPA) Main index of the  Global Protection Agency (GPA)  Global Protection Agency (GPA)
  • Global Rights Global Rights
  • Portal Global Dialogue 2009 Main website of Global Dialogue 2009
  • Global Information Media (GIM) daily proclamations concerning actual issues in the world    Global Information Media (GIM) daily proclamations concerning actual issues in the world
  • Portal of Global Dialogue 2008 Portal of Global Dialogue 2008
  • Proceedings of the Global Dialogue   Proceedings of the Global Dialogue
  • Global Peace Movement amongst nations and people Global Peace Movement amongst nations and people
  • Global Citizens voting on issues Global Community voting on issues
  • The Federation of Global Governments vs the United Nations
  • Civil Society
  • Global Protection Agency (GPA)
  • The Judiciary
  • Global Ministries
  • Essential services
  • Twenty four years ago the Global Community organization was created. Happy 24 th year Anniversary everyone Happy 23 rd year Anniversary everyone


Chapter 20.11     Global Dialogue
Article 1:    One of the most important factors in our lives is the inter-connection we have to others
In this millennium, the affairs of humanity appear to be unfolding in more profound ways.

Cause and effect is more apparent and happening more quickly. Those of you who are educated and aware will find themselves urgently called upon to action for the good of all humanity.

Global link-ups are already happening at a fast rate.

Business leaders are much more sensitive to the greater, wider needs for their expertise and are already in the process of creating a new kind of civilization.

One of the most important factors in our lives is the inter-connection we have to others, to other countries. Through these connections you will be able to create changes for good on a global scale.

We must now all become linked to others in faraway places on a much deeper level if we are to work together to keep our planet healthy and productive and hospitable for all people and living things.

As your awareness of this global need deepens you will want to join with others to see that good changes happen.

Right now you can use your skills, your knowledge, your abilities, to realize how your strengths can help bring about the best kind of changes in the world by connecting with us in our aim to promote sustainable development on four major levels: the land, the richness of our land, our economic endeavours and the welfare of all our peoples.

We believe the world is at a turning point. We can no longer perceive ourselves as a People who could survive alone and a People who does not need anyone else. We belong and depend to a much larger group, that of The Global Community. The 21st Century will see limitless links and interrelationships with The Global Community.

This third millennium is a new challenge. New standards, goals and objectives have to be defined. Firm universal guidelines are essentials in keeping the world healthy. Already we notice new ways of thinking being embraced, new behaviors and attitudes adopted. Global ethics are required to do business and deal with one another to sustain Earth.

Indeed, we are becoming The Global Community made up of an infinite number of small units and the Global Dialogue will bring us all together. Every human being lives within "a Global Community." This is his (her) global private community. One imagines he is inside a glass bubble ~ everything he can see from this glass bubble is his own "global community." Wherever we go, we are inside "a Global Community." Everything, every living creature there, interacts one upon the other. Influences inter-weave and are responsible for causes and effects. We are worlds within worlds orbiting in and out of one another's space, having their being.

Every single human being must deal responsibly with the affairs going on in his own "glass bubble" ~ when a person takes personal responsibility for his own affairs ~ he becomes empowered as a person. He can then reach beyond his own property and family, and help to work with others living in and around, even a part of the local community he lives in ~ the villages, the town community, the surrounding territory, and so on.

The key is personal responsibility. Therefore the individual is the important element, one who takes responsibility for his community. This individual cares about jobs, homes, streets, the community.

When a group of ordinary people realized they, personally, will make the changes they need in their fields, in their village. They can then find ways to bring these changes for all. There is a wisdom in the ways of very humble people that needs to be used. Every humble person deserves to have ideas respected, the courage to develop his own life for the better. Sound solutions to help manage and sustain Earth will very likely be found this way. Everyone can help assess the needs of the planet now (measuring sustainable development) and propose sound solutions for its proper management, present and future (managing sustainable development).

Sound solutions to all our problems will have to be researched and developed and made available to everyone on the Internet. This is la raison d’être of the Global Community organization, the Earth Community Organization (ECO), the Human Family.

Sound solutions made available to all Global Communities should insure a sound future for Earth. Exchange of creative solutions to the varied community problems around the world will benefit us all on many levels ~ socially, economically and ecologically. We can all help to manage Earth this way. We invite you to participate in the create positive actions to insure a sound future for Earth.

Chapter 20.12     Restoration of the planet, our home
Article 1:    Global Community Assessment Centre ( GCAC )
Global Community Assessment Centre ( GCAC ) for discussion and joint action on issues of local and global concerns and for the restoration of the planet, our home. GCAC offers services to the Global Community.
1.     Introduction
2.     GCAC Objectives
3.     Theory, measurement, valuation and management of Sustainable Development and the Scale of Values and measurement of the Gross Environmental Sustainable Development Index (GESDI)
3.0     The Scale of Values and the Benchmark for the 21st Century
3.1     Report on the measurement of the Gross Environmental Sustainable Development Index (GESDI). Title page, Acknowledgement, and Summary
3.2     Scale of Good Practices
3.3     The process of conducting the assessment
3.4     The mathematical model
3.5     On the measurement of sustainable development (GESDI) for a home and the community it belongs to
3.5.1     Historical information about the site
3.5.2     The site
3.5.3    Criteria for home environmental designs to build a healthy home
3.5.4     Management of pollutants in the home
3.5.5     Waste management in the home
3.5.6     Water management in the home
3.5.7     The home transportation system
3.5.8     Shopping habits
Ecological sustainable development
3.5.9     Home maintenance
3.5.10     Environmental behavior when you are outdoors
3.5.11     Environmental behavior at work
3.5.12     Environmental behavior in your yard
3.5.13     Environmental sustainable community development
3.5.14     Energy auditing and management of the home
3.5.15    Energy Management and Conservation Programs in the Community
3.5.16    Air Quality in Buildings
3.5.17    Lighting System in Buildings
3.5.18    Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning System
3.5.19     WHMIS
3.5.20     Health and Safety Hazards
3.5.21     Occupational Health and Safety Committee
3.5.22     Transportation of Dangerous Goods (TDG)
3.5.23     National Building Code
3.5.24     Environmental Hazards
3.5.25     Building Systems Management, Operating and Maintenance Programs
3.5.26     Building Custodial Services and Minor Repairs
3.5.27     Project Management
3.6     Evaluation

3.6.1     Evaluation of Social Indicators and Indices
3.6.2     Evaluation of Economic Development Indicators and Indices
3.6.3     Evaluation of the Availability of Resources Indicators and Indices
3.6.4     Evaluation of Environment Indicators and Indices
3.6.5     Evaluation of Sustainable Development
Province of Alberta
Canada
Global


4.     Active Research Projects
4.1     Transboundary Assessments
4.2     Impact Assessments
4.3     Policy Assessments
4.4     Assessment of local/global indicators
4.5     Integration of local/global indicators to give a sense of direction to The Global Community
4.6     Integration of scientific understanding to policy
4.7     Management of Global Changes

5.     The Global Sustainable Development Project
5.1     Environmental Sustainable Development
5.2     Sustainable Home and Community Development
5.3     Sustainable Economic Development
5.4     Sustainable Resources Development

6.     Integrated Account Systems
7.     Role of businesses, civic organizations, and environmental agencies
in implementing the sustainable use of biodiversity.


8.     Focus 2006
8.1     The Global Community Overall Picture
(i) Energy
(ii) Poverty
(iii) Land
(iv) Biodiversity
(v) Ecological
(vi) Consumption/Production
(vii) Population
(viii) Forests
(ix) Fresh Water
(x) Climate Change
(xi) Financing
(xii) Hazardous Substances/Wastes
(xiii) Ozone Depleting Substances
(xiv) Opportunity for Youth
(xv) Improving Quality of Family Life
(xvi) Developing Healthful Life Styles
(xvii) Home and community Development
8.2     Four Major Quality Systems
i) Environment
ii) People
iii) Availability of Resources
iv) Economic Development
8.3     Global Community Action 1

9.     Volunteering

10.     Collaboration with other organizations

11.     Sponsorship

12.     Contact us

Chapter 20.13     Management of Earth resources
Article 1:    The importance of good environmental governance
In this Chapter, the Global Community focuses on the importance of good environmental governance. We explore how global citizens, government managers, and business owners can foster better environmental decisions that meet the needs of both ecosystems and people with equity and balance.

Article 2:    Environmental governance
The Global Community has previously defined what environmental governance means in everyday terms and how it relates to today's environmental trends and social conditions and assessed the state of environmental governance in nations around the world by conducting a systematic study of environmental governance indicators.

Better environmental governance is one of the most direct routes to reversing the world's environmental decline. Restoration of the planet, our home, requires everyone's cooperation.

Article 3:    Better environmental governance is one of the most direct routes to fairer and more sustainable use of natural resources
Better environmental governance is one of the most direct routes to fairer and more sustainable use of natural resources. Decisions made with greater participation and greater knowledge of natural systems can help reverse the loss of forests, the decline of soil fertility, and the pollution of air and water that reflect our past failures.

Article 4:    Consumerism
People consume goods and services for many reasons: to nourish, clothe, and shelter themselves. But we also consume as part of a community or social group.

Consumerism has made human development a time of opportunities for a healthy and good life, with adequate nutrition, employment, mobility, and education. Poverty is marked by a lack of consumption, and thus a lack of these opportunities. Bad consumption is the source of enormous wastes and can lead to serious pressure on ecosystems. Consumption harms ecosystems directly through overharvesting of animals or plants, mining of soil nutrients, or other forms of biological depletion.

We have destroyed many of our ecosystems through pollution and wastes from agriculture, industry, and energy use, and also through fragmentation by roads and other infrastructure that are part of the production and transportation networks that feed consumers.

Article 5:    Food consumption
Consumption of grains, meat, fish, and wood have increased substantially in the last four decades and will continue to increase as the global economy expands and world population grows. Plausible projections of consumer demand in the next few decades suggest a marked escalation of impacts on ecosystems.

World cereal consumption has more than doubled in the last 35 years, and meat consumption has tripled since 1960. Some 40 percent of the world's grain crop is used to feed livestock raised for meat. A crucial factor in the rise in grain production has been the more than fourfold increase in fertilizer use since 1960. By 2020, demand for cereals is expected to increase nearly 40 percent, and meat demand will surge nearly 60 percent.

The global fish catch has grown more than sixfold since 1950 to 122 million metric tons in 1997. Three-fourths of the global catch is consumed directly by humans as fresh, frozen, dried, or canned fish and shellfish. The remaining 25 percent are reduced to fish meal and oil, which is used for both livestock feed and fish feed in aquaculture. Demand for fish for direct consumption is expected to grow some 25 percent by 2015.

Consumption levels in wealthy nations are very different than those in middle-income and low-income nations. On average, someone living in a developed nation consumes twice as much grain, twice as much fish, three times as much meat, nine times as much paper, and eleven times as much gasoline as someone living in a developing nation.

Consumers in high-income countries—about 18 percent of the world's population—accounted for 80 percent of the money spent on private consumption in 1997 — $15 trillion of the $18 trillion total. By contrast, purchases by consumers in low-income nations—the poorest 35 percent of the world's population—represented less than 2 percent of all private consumption. The money spent on private consumption worldwide (all goods and services consumed by individuals except real estate) nearly tripled between 1980 and 1997.

Article 6:    Global wood consumption
Global wood consumption has increased 71 percent since 1961. More than half of the 4 billion cubic meters of wood consumed annually is burned for fuel; the rest is used in construction and for paper and a variety of other wood products. Demand for lumber and pulp is expected to rise between 20 and 50 percent by 2015. Forest plantations produce 26 percent of all lumber, pulp, and other industrial wood; old-growth and secondary-growth forests provide the rest.

The chief use of the world’s wood is not as building materials or paper, but as fuel. It is a pattern both ancient and modern, and one that is not likely to change in the next several decades. Today, hundreds of millions of people remain completely reliant upon wood for energy and can’t anticipate any rapid transition to other energy sources. In fact, woodfuels are the world’s most important form of nonfossil energy.

Of the 4.6 billion cubic meters (m³) of wood harvested in 1996, close to half—some 2.0 billion m³—are burned for cooking or to provide heat, or are used to make charcoal for later burning. Other wood products also end up being burned for fuel. Commercial wood residues—chips, sawdust, and even the "black liquor" that is a by-product of pulp and paper making—are often fuel sources for commercial energy plants and individuals. Energy plants may also burn used packaging, discarded construction lumber, and paper wastes. About 65 percent of all wood harvested is burned as fuel.

Low-income nations depend most heavily on wood for fuel. Brazil, China, India, Indonesia, and Nigeria account for about half the firewood and charcoal produced and consumed each year.

Wood is the most important of several biomass fuels that also include crop residues and animal dung. Biomass provides roughly 32 percent of the total energy supply in developing countries, and wood accounts for more than half of this—about 18 percent of the energy supply in the developing world. However, in many individual nations, dependence on wood is much higher. Nepal in Asia, and Uganda, Rwanda, and Tanzania in Sub-Saharan Africa, woodfuels provide 80 percent or more of total energy requirements.

In most industrial nations, wood energy contributes only about 6 percent of total energy supply. There are exceptions: wood energy accounts for more than 16 percent of total energy supply in Sweden and Finland, and 14 to 20 percent in some Central and East European countries.

Woodfuel consumption rose by nearly 82 percent between 1960 and 1999, slightly trailing world population growth of 94 percent over the period. The largest increases in woodfuel consumption were reported in Asia and Africa.

Demand for fuelwood and charcoal is driven primarily by growing numbers of rural poor, who depend on wood for their cooking and heating needs. Charcoal, often consumed in the form of briquettes, is also an important fuel among the urban poor, whose numbers are expanding rapidly. Charcoal is also an industrial energy source in some Latin American countries. The steel industry in Brazil, for example, depends heavily on charcoal.

Economic growth might be expected to reduce demand for wood and other biomass in coming years. The conventional view is that, as incomes rise, countries shift toward the use of commercial fuels, such as kerosene, natural gas, and other fossil fuels, and reduce their dependence on biomass. Yet trends to date suggest otherwise: it appears that, even with economic development, woodfuel use will not necessarily decline significantly.

In recent decades, economic growth in the developing world has indeed caused fossil fuel use to increase, and the relative share of energy consumption accounted for by biomass has declined. But the actual quantity of biomass consumed has continued to grow. Biomass consumption in Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines, Thailand, and Vietnam grew by nearly 3 percent annually between 1983 and 1996, when these countries’ economies were growing strongly. In many developing countries, fossil fuels are simply added to the energy mix, not substituted for woodfuels.

Projections of global woodfuel consumption in 2015 range from 2.1 billion m³ (a decrease of 17 percent from 1998 levels) to 5.0 billion m³ (an increase of 140 percent).

Rising demand for fuelwood and charcoal is the cause of deforestation around many cities, towns, and roads. Anecdotal evidence exists of closed forests being affected, notably in India, Sri Lanka, and Thailand.

Chapter 20.14     Education and training for global citizens
Article 1:    Basic education for all Global Community citizens

Basic education for all Global Community citizens. Programs for training and educating

Universal health care, education, retirement security and employment services to every Global Community citizen

Implemented through the Global Community with built-in mechanisms for optimum input and oversight guaranteed to all member-states, the Global Community offers a practicable starting point for achieving:

(a)     a healthful, sustainable environment for every global community citizen,

(b)     universal health care, publicly supported,

(c)     education for all based upon individual capability,

(d)     creative/productive employment for every global community citizen, and

(e)     post-retirement security.



This effort will lead over time to an escalation of human values and symbiotical relationships transcending money centered economics.

The Global Community has developed a program that takes into account personal, social and environmental aspects when helping people, in particular children and youth, to adapt to changing ecological, social, economical, political and other conditions. Environmental education provides a person with knowledge on and responsibility for the state of the environment, provides guidelines how to behave appropriately.

Environmental education and raising of environmental awareness are the main columns of a sustainable society. Environmental films stimulate the emotional perception of ecological problems and motivate people’s action according to their moral principles and hence inspire them to preserve the environment for future generations. And this is very important. If mankind wants to survive, it must take immediate action. Video film demonstrations promote keen emotional perception and understanding of the present ecological problems, encourage interesting discussions and, most important, the wish to solve problems.

Environmental education and raising of environmental awareness are the main columns of a sustainable society.



Chapter 20.15     Employment for global citizens
Article 1:   
Chapter 20.16     Cities:    power, rights, responsibilities and accountabilities
Article 1:    Cities:    power, rights, responsibilities and accountabilities
The Global Community can contribute in evaluating options and strategies for adapting to climate change as it occurs, and in identifying human activities that are even now maladapted to climate. For example, identification of tree species that can grow well under current as well as projected future climates will help develop reforestation programs that are less vulnerable to both climate variability and change. Genetically improved species can be developed to replace the weakess species. Assessment of the role of agricultural subsidies and disaster relief programs in actually encouraging farmers to cultivate lands which are highly susceptible to droughts or floods can improve the adaptability of the agricultural sector. Alternatively, developing socio-economic activities that can thrive under anticipated climate changes can help realize some of the benefits of climate change. Collectively, such actions will help reduce human vulnerability to climate change, and hence raise the threshold at which such change becomes dangerous.

Article 2:    Recommendations
We need to improve on our ability to:
*     predict future anthropogenic emissions of greenhouse gases. While demographic, technological and economic factors are in many respects inherently speculative, better observations and understanding of the processes by which human activities directly or indirectly contribute to emissions are clearly required. These in particular include emissions from deforestation and agricultural activities.
*     obtain more data on the effect of human emissions on atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases. Not only do we need to reduce the uncertainties about past and current sinks for emitted greenhouse gases, but we need to better understand and quantify the long term feedbacks such as CO2 fertilization and physical and biological response to climate change if we expect to improve our confidence in projections of future concentrations.
*     measure direct and indirect effects of radiative forcing of greenhouse gases and aerosols.
*     measure climate sensitivity to changes in radiative forcing.
*     measure the response to climate change of biological and physical processes with the terrestrial and ocean systems. *     obtain an early detection of the signal of human interference with the climate system against the change caused by natural forces or internal system noise is important in fostering timely and responsible coping actions.
*     develop actions to limit emissions of greenhouse gases and prepare to adapt to climate change.
*     live with the facts that climate change is unavoidable, atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations are already signficantly higher than pre-industrial levels, and that aggressive efforts to reduce their anthropogenic emission sources would only slow down the growth in their concentrations, not stop it. Therefore, policy response to this issue must also include strategies to adapt to the consequences of unavoidable climate change.

In an urban community site, air usually contains materials such as nitric oxide, sulfur oxide, carbon monoxide, aldehydes, dust and many others.

Article 3:    Measuring indicators and indices
A city would have a department measuring indicators and indices in order to:
a)     Provide a daily report to the public
b)     Define air pollution in terms of the amount of pollution created by polluters
c)     Define air quality in all parts of the city
d)     Measure progress toward air quality goals
e)     Propose abatement steps
f)     Alarm the public in case of danger
g)     Provide data to researchers
h)     Provide information for compliance
i)     Make intelligent decisions with regard to priorities of programs toward environmental improvement

Article 4:    Recommendations to alleviate the effects of climate change in the world
The Global Community makes the following recommendations to alleviate the effects of climate change in the world:
*     Introduction of appropriate sustainable agricultural system with balanced use of chemical fertilizers incorporated organic minerals and green manure's.

*     Phase wise replacement of chemical fertilizer by organic fertilizer. Similarly biodegradable insecticide should be replace by the non-biodegradable insecticides.
*     The entrepreneur should take proper mitigation measures of industrial pollution by set-up of industrial waste treatment plant.
*     Control of insect, pests through biological, natural process, alternatives of using harmful insecticides or fungicides is important to introduce.
*     Promotion of research activities in the field of industrial waste utilization and waste recovery process.
*     Re-utilization of agricultural residues through bio-conservation to industrial products.
*     Need proper implementation of Environmental Policy, Environment Conservation Act’s and Legislation.
*     Enhancement of the capacity of NGOs, Govt. agencies to successfully implement poverty alleviation program including non-formal education on environmental pollution awareness.
*     Immediate and honest actions by the USA, Russia, Japan and Canada, and all countries in resolving the problems creating the greenhouse gases. The ratification of the Kyoto Protocol and the implementation of measurable positive actions to resolve the problems of global warming.
*     The support of the Climate Change Ministry.
Article 5:    Government leadership
The Global Community proposes measures in the following areas to reduce GHG emissions.
Government leadership – set aggressive GHG reduction targets for provincial facilities and vehicle fleets, enforce standards for major building projects;
Urban land use – use tax shifting to discourage sprawl and favour more compact, transit-oriented communities; develop a policy to promote shared energy systems; and work with municipalities to provide incentives and tools for encouraging GHG reduction targets in official community plans and regional strategies by 2005;
Transportation – implement increased funding of transit and strategic road improvements, California-style vehicle emission standards for cars, higher emission standards for light to heavy duty trucks, and incentives to purchase more fuel-efficient vehicles and lower GHG fuels;
Buildings – establish phased-in energy performance standards, with a revolving fund for energy efficiency upgrades, provincial tax relief for the purchase of sustain-able products and equipment, and other supporting policies;
Electricity – adopt a GHG emission standard and offset requirement for thermal power generation that is coordinated with the federal government and builds on the province’s current energy efficiency and clean energy objectives;
Natural gas – develop an efficient and harmonized regulatory, fiscal, and land access framework to facilitate expansion of natural gas production consistent with sustainability; and tax or other incentives to reduce fugitive emissions and to promote acid gas reinjection into depleted reservoirs for disposing of CO2 emissions;
Fuel cells – prepare a strategic plan to grow BC’s world leading fuel cell cluster; make a long-term provincial commitment to the hydrogen economy; and ensure active government participation in private and public sector fuel cell demonstrations;
Forest products – establish incentives to encourage energy from biomass; targets and support for afforestation and reforestation projects; and policies to prevent deforestation (all consistent with international carbon accounting protocols); and
Aluminum (and other sectors) – negotiate voluntary binding agreements for GHG emission reduction with the aluminum smelting and other industry sectors that are harmonized with federal initiatives.

Chapter 20.17     Agriculture and needs of the Global Community

The impacts of climate change on the growth in crop and livestock production, forestry and fisheries, the deceleration of the world population growth rate and the rise in food consumption will contribute to an increase in the demand for food and for food production. Poverty and poor food distribution will continue to limit access to food in many countries.


The Global Community believes that at the world level, there will not be sufficient agricultural production to meet increases in demand over the next thirty years. By 2030, climate change due to global warming will start having significant impacts on food prodution and crop production in developing countries is projected to be significantly less than in the 1990s.


Food security exists when all people, at all times, have physical and economic access to sufficient, safe and nutritious food to meet their dietary needs and food preferences for an active and healthy life.

Article 1:    World population
Article 2:    Genetic engineering
Article 3:    Food Consumption
Article 4:    Food Production
Article 5:    Sustainable food security at the individual, household, national, regional and global levels is a primordial huam right.
Article 6:    Action Plan of the Global Community

World population

The world population is expected to reach eight billion by 2030 and growth in global agriculture will not be sufficient to meet world demand.

The Global Community has estimated the world population growth, and assessed future developments in world food production, demand, and consumption. The impacts of global warming on the growth in crop and livestock production, forestry and fisheries, the deceleration of the world population growth rate and the rise in food consumption will contribute to an increase in the demand for food and for food production. Poverty and poor food distribution will continue to limit access to food in many countries.

Genetic engineering


The potential agricultural benefits of genetic engineering were considered. Genetically engineered crops, livestock, and fish were included in this project.


The effects of the Global Community policies on the global population trends indicates a drastic slowdown in world population growth. The 2010 population level was obtained to be 7.6 billion. This recalibration in population level is due in part to changes in the world population growth rate, which has fallen from 2.1 percent per year in the later half of the 1960's to 1.3 percent in the late 1990's. This growth rate is predicted to continue dropping over the next three decades, reaching 0.8 percent by 2030. By 2050 the global population growth rate is expected to have dropped as low as 0.4 percent.

Food Consumption


Concurrent with a decreasing population growth rate, individual food consumption rates (measured as Kcal/person/day) will continue to rise in developing countries. The percent of the world's undernourished has been dropping since the late 1960s. Projections of food consumption will continue to rise in developing countries over the next 30 years, moving from an average of 2626 kcal in the 1990s to 3000 kcal in 2015. The average daily consumption rate in developing countries is expected to exceed 3000 kcal by 2030.

By 2015, 22 percent of the world population will still live in countries with very low food consumption levels (under 2200 kcal). High rates of undernourishment will be most pronounced in sub-Saharan Africa.

Leading causes of continued problems in food availability:

a)     global warming,
b)     failures by countries to achieve rapid economic development, and
c)     low quality soils.

Food Production


The Global Community believes that at the world level, there will not be sufficient agricultural production to meet increases in demand over the next thirty years. By 2030, climate change due to global warming will start having significant impacts on food prodution and crop production in developing countries is projected to be significantly less than in the 1990s.

The rate of annual growth in global crop production is expected to decrease over the next 30 years relative to those advances seen in the previous 30.

Sustainable food security at the individual, household, national, regional and global levels is a primordial huam right.

The Global Community reaffirms the right of everyone to have access to safe and nutritious food, consistent with the right to adequate food and the fundamental right of everyone to be free from hunger.

All Peoples of the Global Community pledge the political will and common commitment to achieving food security for all and to an ongoing effort to eradicate hunger in all countries, with an immediate view to reducing the number of undernourished people to half their present level no later than 2015.

It is not right that more than 800 million people throughout the world, and particularly in developing countries, do not have enough food to meet their basic nutritional needs. This situation is unacceptable. Constraints on access to food and continuing inadequacy of household and national incomes to purchase food, instability of supply and demand, as well as natural and man-made disasters, prevent basic food needs from being fulfilled. The problems of hunger and food insecurity have global dimensions and are likely to persist, and even increase dramatically in some regions, unless urgent, determined and concerted action is taken, given the anticipated increase in the world's population and the stress on natural resources.

The Global Community believes that a peaceful, stable and enabling political, social and economic environment is the essential foundation which will enable communities all over the world to give adequate priority to food security and poverty eradication. Democracy, promotion and protection of all human and Earth rights and fundamental freedoms, including the right to development, and the full and equal participation of men and women are essential for achieving sustainable food security for all.

Poverty is a major cause of food insecurity and sustainable progress in poverty eradication is critical to improve access to food. Conflict, terrorism, corruption and environmental degradation also contribute significantly to food insecurity. Increased food production, including staple food, must be undertaken.


Poverty is a major cause of food insecurity and sustainable progress in poverty eradication is critical to improve access to food. Conflict, terrorism, corruption and environmental degradation also contribute significantly to food insecurity. Increased food production, including staple food, must be undertaken. This should happen within the framework of world sustainable management
of

A)     natural resources,
B)     elimination of unsustainable patterns of consumption and production, particularly in industrialized countries, and
C)     early stabilization of the world population.

The Global Community recognizes the fundamental contribution to food security by women, particularly in rural areas of developing countries, and the need to ensure equality between men and women. Revitalization of rural areas must also be a priority to enhance social stability and help redress the excessive rate of rural-urban migration confronting many countries.

The Global Community realizes how urgent it is of taking action now to fulfil our responsibility to achieve food security for present and future generations. Attaining food security is a complex task for which the primary responsibility rests with individual governments. They have to develop an enabling environment and have policies that ensure peace, as well as social, political and economic stability and equity and gender equality. The Global Community expresses our deep concern over the persistence of hunger which, on such a scale, constitutes a threat both to national societies and, through a variety of ways, to the stability of the Global Community itself.

Food should not be used as an instrument for political and economic pressure. The Global Community reinstates the importance of global cooperation and solidarity as well as the necessity of refraining from unilateral measures not in accordance with the international law and the Charter of the Global Community and that endanger food security.

Action Plan of the Global Community


*     promote policies conducive to investment in human resource development, research and infrastructure for achieving food security;
*     promote equitable access to productive and financial resources;
*     pursue food trade and overall trade policies that will encourage our producers and consumers to utilize available resources in an economically sound and global sustainable manner;
*     recognize the importance for food security of sustainable agriculture, fisheries, forestry and rural development in low as well as high potential areas;
*     acknowledge the fundamental role of farmers, fishers, foresters, indigenous people and their communities, and all other people involved in the food sector, and of their organizations, supported by effective research and extension, in attaining food security;
*     promote full participation and empowerment of people, especially women, an equitable distribution of income, access to health care and education, and opportunities for youth. Particular attention should be given to those who cannot produce or procure enough food for an adequate diet, including those affected by war, civil strife, natural disaster or climate related ecological changes.
*     combat pests, drought, and natural resource degradation including desertification, overfishing and erosion of biological diversity;
*     make efforts to mobilize, and optimize the allocation and utilization of, technical and financial resources from all sources, including external debt relief for developing countries, to reinforce national actions to implement sustainable food security policies. *     ensure an enabling political, social, and economic environment designed to create the best conditions for the eradication of poverty and for durable peace, based on full and equal participation of women and men, which is most conducive to achieving sustainable food security for all;
*     implement policies aimed at eradicating poverty and inequality and improving physical and economic access by all, at all times, to sufficient, nutritionally adequate and safe food and its effective utilization;
*     pursue participatory and sustainable food, agriculture, fisheries, forestry and rural development policies and practices in high and low potential areas, which are essential to adequate and reliable food supplies at the household, national, regional and global levels, and combat pests, drought and desertification, considering the multifunctional character of agriculture;
*     strive to ensure that food, agricultural trade and overall trade policies are conducive to fostering food security for all through a fair and market-oriented world trade system;
*     prevent and be prepared for natural disasters and man-made emergencies and to meet transitory and emergency food requirements in ways that encourage recovery, rehabilitation, development and a capacity to satisfy future needs;
*     promote optimal allocation and use of public and private investments to foster human resources, sustainable food, agriculture, fisheries and forestry systems, and rural development, in high and low potential areas; and
*     implement, monitor, and follow-up this Plan of Action at all levels in cooperation with the international community.


Food security exists when all people, at all times, have physical and economic access to sufficient, safe and nutritious food to meet their dietary needs and food preferences for an active and healthy life. In this regard, concerted action at all levels is required. Each nation must adopt a strategy consistent with its resources and capacities to achieve its individual goals and, at the same time, cooperate regionally and globally in order to organize collective solutions to global issues of food security. In a world of increasingly interlinked institutions, societies and economies, coordinated efforts and shared responsibilities are essential.

Poverty eradication is essential to improve access to food. The vast majority of those who are undernourished, either cannot produce or cannot afford to buy enough food. They have inadequate access to means of production such as land, water, inputs, improved seeds and plants, appropriate technologies and farm credit. In addition, wars, civil strife, natural disasters, climate related ecological changes and environmental degradation have adversely affected millions of people. Although food assistance may be provided to ease their plight, it is not a long term solution to the underlying causes of food insecurity. It is important to maintain an adequate capacity in the international community to provide food aid, whenever it is required, in response to emergencies. Equitable access to stable food supplies should be ensured.

A peaceful and stable environment in every country is a fundamental condition for the attainment of sustainable food security. Governments are responsible for creating an enabling environment for private and group initiatives to devote their skills, efforts and resources, and in particular investment, towards the common goal of food for all. This should be undertaken with the cooperation and participation of all members of society. Farmers, fishers and foresters and other food producers and providers, have critical roles in achieving food security, and their full involvement and enablement are crucial for success.

Poverty, hunger and malnutrition are some of the principal causes of accelerated migration from rural to urban areas in developing countries. The largest population shift of all times is now under way. Unless these problems are addressed in an appropriate and timely fashion, the political, economic and social stability of many countries and regions may well be seriously affected, perhaps even compromising world peace. It is necessary to target those people and areas suffering most from hunger and malnutrition and identify causes and take remedial action to improve the situation. A more complete, user-friendly source of information at all levels would enable this.

Availability of enough food for all can be attained. The 6.5 billion people in the world today have, on average, 25 percent more food per person than the global population of 4 billion people had 20 years ago. Yet, further large increases in world food production, through the sustainable management of natural resources, are required to feed a growing population, and achieve improved diets. Increased production, including traditional crops and their products, in efficient combination with food imports, reserves, and international trade can strengthen food security and address regional disparities. Food aid is one of the many instruments which can help to promote food security. Long term investment in research and in cataloguing and conserving genetic resources, particularly at the national level, is essential. The link between sufficient food supplies and household food security must be ensured.

Harmful seasonal and inter-annual instability of food supplies can be reduced. Progress should include targeting on minimizing the vulnerability to, and impact of, climate fluctuations and pests and diseases. To effect timely transfers of supplies to deficit areas and the conservation and sustainable use of biodiversity, use should be made, in efficient combination, of climate early warning systems, transfer and utilization of appropriate agricultural,2 fishery and forestry technologies, production, and reliable trade, storage and financial mechanisms. Natural and man-made disasters can often be anticipated or even prevented, and response must be timely and effective and assist recovery.

Unless national governments and the international community address the multifaceted causes underlying food insecurity, the number of hungry and malnourished people will remain very high in developing countries, particularly in Africa south of the Sahara; and sustainable food security will not be achieved. This situation is unacceptable.The Global Community envisages an ongoing effort to eradicate hunger in all countries, with an immediate view to reducing the number of undernourished people to half their present level no later than 2015, and a mid-term review to ascertain whether it is possible to achieve this target by 2010.

The resources required for investment will be generated mostly from domestic private and public sources. The international community has a key role to play in supporting the adoption of appropriate national policies and, where necessary and appropriate, in providing technical and financial assistance to assist developing countries and countries with economies in transition in fostering food security.

Reaching sustainable world food security is part and parcel of achieving the social, economic, environmental and human development objectives agreed upon in recent international conferences.

Chapter 20.18     Preventive actions against polluters
Article 1:    A crime against humanity and all life on Earth not to ratify the Kyoto Protocol

It is a crime against humanity and all life on Earth not to ratify the Kyoto Protocol. It is a terrible crime against the global life-support systems, against the very existence of the next generations. On the Scale of Global Rights the crime is of maximum importance. There is no need to wait for the election of the Global Community to create the Earth Court of Justice. The Court can be formed now and incorporated to the Global Community.


Article 2:    The military should be asked to do today is to protect the global life-support systems
The world is too crowded and too small nowadays! And weapons too lethal! So security cannot be achieved through the military. The only job the military should be asked to do today is to protect the global life-support systems. These systems have the highest priority on the Scale of Global Rights and are certainly more important than any of the other rights on the Scale including security. Simply because without life there is no other right possible. Without Oxygen there is no life! Without clean water there is no life! So protect life on Earth at all costs. Wars are the biggest threat to life and the ecosystem of the planet.

Article 3:    The production and trade in arms now listed as a criminal act against humanity

The production and trade in arms should be listed as a criminal act against humanity; this global ministry will introduce a Convention on the curtailment of the arms trade, a provision for a mandatory Arms Register and the prohibition of the financing or subsidy of arms exports by governments.


Article 4:    The Earth Court of Justice has listed America as the first nation to be prosecuted for a global environmental crime.
The Earth Court of Justice
has listed America as the first nation to be prosecuted for a global environmental crime. Because the leader of the USA was responsible for not signing the Kyoto Protocol, President George W. Bush will be first to appear in Court. He is an evil man. In comparison, he makes Adolf Hitler and Saddam Hussein look like kids in the block. The splitting of America into separate independent states living at peace for the good of all would certainly be a better solution to all Americans and the world.

The reality here is that every American is on trial here. A large majority of the consumers in USA are also responsible for producing the deadly gas causing global warming, and they are all on trial. The same goes for every person on Earth producing the deadly gas. The gas is just as deadly as the gas that murdered millions of Jews during World War II. It is even more deadly as it is destroying the global life-support systems of all life on Earth. We are killing billions of human beings and countless life species. Americans have closed their conscience to the reality of life on Earth. Justice must prevail to stop the "killing fields". And therefore they are guilty as charge.

It is a crime against humanity and all life on Earth not to ratify the Kyoto Protocol. It is a terrible crime against the global life-support systems, against the very existence of the next generations. On the Scale of Global Rights the crime is of maximum importance. There is no need to wait for the election of the Global Community to create the Earth Court of Justice. The Court can be formed now and incorporated to the Global Community.

Prosecuting criminals on the basis of universal jurisdiction regardless of a territorial or nationality nexus required a solid commitment of political will from national governments and the Global Community.

Once in effect, the Earth Court of Justice will become the principal judicial organ of the Global Community. The Court will have a dual role: to settle in accordance with international law the legal disputes submitted to it by national governments, local communities, and in some special cases by corporations, non-government-organizations and citizens, and to give advisory opinions on legal questions referred to it by duly authorized organs and agencies.

The Court will be composed of judges elected by the Elected Representatives Council and Earth Security Council. It may not include more than one judge of any nationality. The Members of the Court do not represent their governments but are independent magistrates. The judges must possess the qualifications required in their respective countries for appointment to the highest judicial offices, or by jurists of recognized competence in international law. The composition of the Court has also to reflect the main forms of civilization and the principal legal systems of the world.

Article 5:    The Earth Court of Justice will hear cases involving many different types of crimes
The Earth Court of Justice will hear cases involving:

*     nation states
*     national political and military leaders accountable for violations of international humanitarian law
*     'core' crimes of genocide
*     crimes against humanity and human rights
*     war crimes
*     crimes with significant impacts perpetuated against the life-support system of the planet (for instance wars and use of weapons of widespread destruction are listed under this category)
*     crimes related to the relentless misuse of the Earth Resources
*     environmental crimes
*     social crimes as the Court may see apply
*     crimes stemming from the global ministries

The Earth Court of Justice will also rule on global problems and concerns such as the creation of a new nation in the world, and disputing territories or land between nations.

The procedure followed by the Court is defined in its Statute. The Court decides in accordance with:

*     the Charter of the Global Community,
*     the Scale of Global Rights,
*     belief, values, principles and aspirations of the New Age,
*     international treaties and conventions in force,
*     international custom,
*     the general principles of law and,
*     as subsidiary means, judicial decisions and the teachings of the most highly qualified publicists.

The Earth Court of Justice will handle environmental damage cause by the U.S. military action. The Global Community has classified the damage as a criminal liability for military personnel and/or their contractors. The war industry has become a liability to humanity.

The Global Community has broadened the traditional focus of the security of states to include both the security of people as well as that of the planet. Global security policies include:

*     every person on Earth has a right to a secure existence, and all states have an obligation to protect those rights
*     prevention of conflicts and wars; identification, anticipation, and resolving conflicts before they become armed confrontations. The Earth Court of Justice will help here.
*     military force is not a legitimate political instrument
*     weapons of mass destruction are not legitimate instruments of national defence
*     eliminate all weapons of mass destruction from all nations and have inspectors verifying progress to that effect
*     all nations should sign and ratify the conventions to eliminate nuclear, chemical and biological weapons
*     the production and trade in arms should be listed as a criminal act against humanity; this global ministry will introduce a Convention on the curtailment of the arms trade, a provision for a mandatory Arms Register and the prohibition of the financing or subsidy of arms exports by governments
*     the development of military capabilities is a potential threat to the security of people and all life on Earth; the ministry will make the demilitarization of global politics a high priority.
*     anticipating and managing crises before they escalate into armed conflicts and wars
*     maintaining the integrity of the environment and global life-support systems
*     managing the environmental, economic, social, political and military conditions that threatened the security of people and the planet
*     over the past decades and even now today, all Five Permanent Members of the United Nations Security Council (mostly the United States, Russia and Britain) were responsible for selling weapons and war equipment. These three nations are required to give back to the Global Community an amount of 8 trillion dollars (American) as a payment for the immense damage they have caused in the world. They have created a culture of violence throughout the world. They are nation bullies, nation predators. They are responsible for economic mismanagement, ethnic tensions, crimes, drug abuse, high unemployment, urban stress, worldwide poverty, and pressures on natural resources. Most conflicts in the world are direct legacies of cold war power politics, senseless politics. Other conflicts were caused by the end of the cold war and the collapse of old regimes. Other factors have combined to increase tension: religious, economical, political, and ethnic aspects.



Primordial human rights come next on the Scale of Global Rights. Without a shelter life will still exist in some places but is not possible in cold place. There are many related aspects of the global life-support systems:

*     global warming
*     Ozone layer
*     wastes of all kind including nuclear and release of radiation
*     climate change
*     species of the fauna and flora becoming extinct
*     losses of forest cover and of biological diversity
*     the capacity for photosynthesis
*     the water cycle
*     food production systems
*     genetic resources
*     chemicals produced for human use and not found in nature and, eventually, reaching the environment with impacts on Earth's waters, soils, air, and ecology


In the past, security was thought as better accomplished through military means. Expanding the military capabilities and forming alliances with other nations were the only way to 'win'. Today wars are unlikely to produce winners. The Global Community is all over the planet. Ethnic groups are everywhere. Some say there are more Italians in Montreal, Canada that there are in Italy. So we would fight our own people? Wars truly make no sense! The world is too crowded and too small nowadays! And weapons too lethal! So security cannot be achieved through the military. The only job the military should be asked to do today is to protect the global life-support systems. These systems have the highest priority on the Scale of Global Rights and are certainly more important than any of the other rights on the Scale including security. Simply because without life there is no other right possible. Without Oxygen there is no life! Without clean water there is no life! So protect life on Earth at all costs. Wars are the biggest threat to life and the ecosystem of the planet.

So security must be achieved by other means than wars. We might as well shelved the war industry from humanity right now and that means phasing out all nuclear, biological, chemical weapons right now. No waiting! That also means having inspectors verifying the phasing out in all nations of the world, and not just in some Middle East country. The nature of global security has changed since the rise of the Earth Government. Security used to be about the protection of the state and its boundaries, people, institutions and values from an outside threat. Earth Government will emphasize as a priority the prohibition of external interference in the internal affairs of sovereign states. Today the security of people within the Earth Government is just as important as the security of states. Citizens must be secure. Earth Government is just as important as the security and life of citizens and states.

There are many threats to security other than the threats to the global life-support systems and threat caused by weapons of mass destruction and the threats to the sovereignty of a state, and they include:

*     the proliferation of conventional small arms
*     the terrorizing of civilian populations by domestic groups
*     gross violations of global rights


Global security can only be achieved if it can be shared by all peoples and through global co-operation, based on principles as explained in the Charter of the Global Community such as justice, human dignity, and equity for all and for the good of all. All people and states are protected by the Global Community.

Chapter 20.19     The cattle and beef industry
Article 1:    The cattle and beef industry

We will have to produce less livestock as we effectively double the population we need to feed: ourselves, plus the livestock that is supposed to be feeding us. We also have to apportion the land surface of the whole world more efficiently, using some for highhly intensive food production (which makes use of less land), some for extensive agriculture (combining food production with wildlife conservation) and designing some specifically as wilderness areas with global corridors between them.


There are currently 1.5 billion cattle populating the earth. They take up nearly 27% of the land mass of the planet and consume enough grain to feed hundreds of millions of people. Their combined weight exceeds that of the human population of earth.

Beef is an inefficient way to deliver protein and energy to people. The world has reached a plateau where, with 27% of the world's land mass dedicated to beef industry and the human population and cattle population rising, something has to give.

The sad irony of the present situation is that while the poor nations of the world are starving their own populations to export beef, the beef buying rich are dying from the diseases of brought up by wealth (and our health care costs as a result are breaking the economy).

Overgrazing is a problem worldwide, and it isn't only a problem with cattle.

In the USA, the giant meat packers are using a new inspection system called the Streamlined Inspection System (SIS), which virtually eliminates the role of the federal meat inspector in the examination of beef destined for interstate and foreign (Canadian) markets. With this system, less than 1% of the carcasses are examined by federal inspectors, whereas they used to examine every animal that came down the line. In the interest of speeding up production, cutting costs, and improving profit margins, the American beef industry has seriously undermined the safety and health of the nation's slaughterhouses.

Beef is the most dangerous food for herbicide contamination and ranks third in insecticide contamination. Eighty percent of all herbicides in the U.S. are sprayed on corn and soybeans which are used primarily as feed for cattle and other livestock. When consumed by the animals, the pesticides accumulate in their bodies. The pesticides are then passed along to the consumer in the finished cuts of beef. Large feedlots have other sources of potential chemical contamination in beef including use of industrial sewage and oils in feedlot mixtures and aerial spraying of insecticides on feedlot cattle.

There are no sustainable alternative way to produce beef. Eat organic beef or better yet, don't eat it all. However, cattle as a subsidiary component of a grain or potato farm can contribute to the sustainability of farming through utilization of waste feeds and crop residues, and facilitates the growing of soil improving forages and cover crops.

Today's reality is that the planet is overcrowded with people and cattle. Peoples have been starved to support the beef addiction of a handful of wealthy nations. In Europe, the United States and Japan, this addiction has resulted in millions of deaths from heart attack, cancer and diabetes- the diseases of wealth.


The ecological effects of the cattle industry:

*     rain forests burned,
*     fertile plains turned into desert, and
*     climate threatened by global warming.


The Global Community has to regulate its population by means that are voluntary and benign and has to take along with a fair proportion of other lifeforms. Proper Earth management will certainly be a necessary tool to achieve our goal. If not there will be a collapse of humanity and of the environment. From now on every global decision we do will have tremendous consequences on our future.
In general, populations of all lifeforms grow exponentially that is by a steady proportion of whatever was there before. When there is no practical limit on resource then populations usually grow maximally and the only limit is that of the reproductive capacity of the female animal. About 10,000 years ago, human beings were obliged to commit themselves more or less fully to agriculture and the human population was 5 to 10 million. By the time of Christ, after only 8,000 years of large-scale agriculture, the human population was 100 to 300 million. After this time, the exponential growth of the population entered its rapid phase. The billion mark was passed by 1800 A.D. By year 2000, the human population exceeded 6 billion. Thus agriculture allowed a thousand-fold increase in numbers over a period of 10,000 years.

We need to form a global ministry dealing only about agriculture and the protection of our soils. All nations will be part of the ministry. We have to design systems of food production that meet our own needs, and also leave room for these other lifeforms we want to take along with us. Western agriculture is designed in the end to maximize profit. As a primordial human right, the prime concern of the human species is to feed people. Therefore we have to do things differently. We will have to produce less livestock as we effectively double the population we need to feed: ourselves, plus the livestock that is supposed to be feeding us. We also have to apportion the land surface of the whole world more efficiently, using some for highhly intensive food production (which makes use of less land), some for extensive agriculture (combining food production with wildlife conservation) and designing some specifically as wilderness areas with global corridors between them. Hopefully this will help natives of British Columbia, Canada, to settle their land claims in their favor as they are the only people in Canada who can help protecting wildlife, at least for now. There should be a definite and specific clause in any agreement with the natives that it is what they will do with the land and not turn it into a huge industrial site as would the white man do.
Chapter 20.20     Earth environmental governance
Article 1:    Earth environmental governance

Earth Environmental Governance can only be achieved successfully within the larger context of Sustainable Developent and Earth Management. All aspects are inter-related and affect one another.



When there is a need to find a solution to a problem or a concern, a sound solution would be to choose a measure or conduct an action, if possible, which causes reversible damage as oppose to a measure or an action causing an irreversible loss.







The environmental movement now has encompasses global aspects under the umbrella of the Earth Ministry of the Environment. Earth Environmental Governance is the most importance and urgent challenge of the Global Community.

Earth Environmental Governance can only be achieved successfully within the larger context of Sustainable Developent and Earth Management. All aspects are inter-related and affect one another.

A healthy environment is essential to long term prosperity and well-being, and citizens in the Global Community demand a high level of ecological protection. This is the 'raison d'etre' of the Scale of Global Rights.

In this way the Scale of Humand and Earth Rights gives us a 'sense of direction' for future planning and managing of the Earth. Earth management is now well defined and becomes a goal to achieve. We no longer waste energy and resources in things that are absolutely unimportant.

The Global Community found evident that the ecological base is the essential prerequisite for the effectiveness and exercise of all rights recognized for human beings. The stewardship of the ecological base has to be given priority before the fulfilment of various economic and social wishes. Demands resulting from the socio-economic system of a particular country have to find their limits in the protection of the global ecosystem.

Vital interests of future generations have to be considered as having priority before less vital interests of the present generation. Supply chains have to be designed in a way, that the goods can enter after usage or consumption into natural or industrial recycling processes.

If serious damages to persons, animals, plants and the ecosystem cannot be excluded, an action or pattern of behaviour should be refrained from. A measure for supplying goods or services should choose a path which entails the least possible impact on the ecological and social system concerned. This way functioning proven systems will not be disturbed, and unnecessary risks will not be taken.

Supply strategies consuming less resources should have preference before those enhancing more resource consumption. The Global Community has also extended the idea of sustainability to be a moral and ethical state, as well as an economic and environmental state, wherein sustainable consumption patterns respect the universal values of peace, security, justice and equity within the human relationships that exist in the Global Community.

When there is a need to find a solution to a problem or a concern, a sound solution would be to choose a measure or conduct an action, if possible, which causes reversible damage as oppose to a measure or an action causing an irreversible loss.

Chapter 20.21     Alternative energy
Article 1:    World energy demand can be largely fulfilled by renewable energy technologies





World energy demand can be largely fulfilled by renewable energy technologies. There is however a strong opposition to change arising from the fossil fuel industry and from governments of most oil-producing nations and major fossil fuel users such as the United States and Britain.

World energy demand

World energy demand can be largely fulfilled by renewable energy technologies. There is however a strong opposition to change arising from the fossil fuel industry and from governments of most oil-producing nations and major fossil fuel users such as the United States and Britain.

There are significant advantages of shifting away from fossil fuels and nuclear energy and toward greater reliance on renewables. Decreasing the impacts of global warming is certainly the most significant advantage. Global carbon emissions must be reduced at least 70% over the next hundred years to stabilize atmospheric CO2 concentrations at 450 parts per million (ppm). The sooner societies begin to make the transition from fossil fuels to renewables, the lower will be the impacts and the associated costs of both climate change and emissions reductions.

Other costs of conventional energy production and use are:

1.    degradation of the environment through resource extraction
2.    air, soil, and water pollution
3.    acid rain
4.    biodiversity loss
5.    fuelling of the war industry, and therefore a threat to peace and Earth security and, in consequences, a threat to the global life-support systems
6.    global economic losses due to natural disasters are in line with events anticipated as a result of global warming
7.    nuclear power is one of the most expensive means of generating electricity and is responsible for nuclear accidents, weapons proliferation, and nuclear waste problems
8.    political, economic and military conflicts over limited resources such as oil become more important as demand increases
9.    reliance on fossil fuels create less jobs; renewables create four times more jobs
10.    fossil fuels do not bring electricity in many poor countries but renewables can; no electricity means no access to education, clean water, improved health care, communications, and entertainment


The United States represents 25 percent of current global emissions, and 36.4 percent of industrial-country 1990 emissions. Withdrawal from negotiations on the Kyoto Protocol dealt a blow to the Global Community efforts to battle climate change.

The Global Community is interested to enact renewable energy policies that:

a)    are consistent and long-term to allow industries and markets to adjust
b)     provide access to the electric grid
c)    educate and inform the public
d)    encourage individual and cooperative ownership of projects
e)    establish standards
f)    incorporate all costs in the price of energy sources

Chapter 20.22     Global response to events: emergencies, rescues and aid
Article 1:    Global response to events: emergencies, rescues and aid

Help Tsunamis victims.

Massive Quake and Tsunamis strike Indian Ocean

Massive Quake and Tsunamis strike Indian Ocean.


A)     Food production for the Global Community
B)     Sound solutions to help manage and sustain Earth
C)     A global sustainable development
D)    Portal of sustainable development
E)     A democratically planned global economy - Societal Sustainability
F)     Long term well-being as a solution to world sustainable development
G)     Societal sustainability is really about symbiotical relationships
H)     Same-sex marriages







A) Food production for the Global Community

We need to form a global ministry dealing only about agriculture and the protection of our soils. All nations will be part of the ministry. We have to design systems of food production that meet our own needs, and also leave room for these other lifeforms we want to take along with us. Western agriculture is designed in the end to maximize profit. As a primordial human right, the prime concern of the human species is to feed people. Therefore we have to do things differently. We will have to produce less livestock as we effectively double the population we need to feed: ourselves, plus the livestock that is supposed to be feeding us. We also have to apportion the land surface of the whole world more efficiently, using some for highhly intensive food production (which makes use of less land), some for extensive agriculture (combining food production with wildlife conservation) and designing some specifically as wilderness areas with global corridors between them.

B)     Sound solutions to help manage and sustain Earth

The Global Community has given back responsibility to every global community citizen on Earth. Everyone shares responsibility for the present and future well-being of life within Earth Community. We will work together in working out sound solutions to local and global problems. It would be wrong and dishonest to blame it all on the leader of a country. Most problems in the world must find solutions at the local and global community levels (and not assume that the leader alone is responsible and will handle it). There is a wisdom in the ways of very humble people that needs to be utilized. Every humble person deserves to have ideas respected, and encouraged to develop his or her own life for the better. Sound solutions to help manage and sustain Earth will very likely be found this way. Everyone can help assess the needs of the planet and propose sound solutions for its proper management, present and future. Everyone can think of better ideas to sustain all life on Earth and realize these ideas by conducting positive and constructive actions. When there is a need to find a solution to a problem or a concern, a sound solution would be to choose a measure or conduct an action, if possible, which causes reversible damage as opposed to a measure or an action causing an irreversible loss; that is the grassroots process. The Global Community Organization can help people realized their actions by coordinating efforts efficiently together.

C)     A global sustainable development

The Global Community believes all citizens have the right to share the wealth in the world. Foreign investment and the trade agreement must protect and improve social and environmental rights, not just the economy. A global sustainable development would mean finding a sound balance among the interactions designed to create a healthy economic growth, preserve environmental quality, make a wise use of our resources, and enhance social benefits. Free trade cannot proceed at the expense of the environment, labour rights, human rights and the sovereignty of a nation. Free trade will lead to an increase in poverty by giving investor rights priority over government decision-making. Employers will be looking for more concessions from workers. Small businesses will find it more difficult to grow and compete against large corporations.


For the first time in human history, and the first time this millennium, humanity has proposed a benchmark:

*     formation of global ministries in all important aspects of our lives
*     the Scale of Global Rights as a replacement to the Universal Declaration of Human Rights
*     an evolved Democracy based on the Scale of Global Rights and the Charter of the Global Community
*     a central organization for Earth management, the restoration of the planet and Earth governance: the Global Community Assessment Centre (GCAC)
*     the Earth Court of Justice to deal with all aspects of the Governance and Mangement of the Earth
*     a new impetus given to the way of doing business and trade
*     more new, diversified (geographical, economical, political, social, business, religious) symbiotical relationships between nations, communities, businesses, for the good and well-being of all
*     the event and formation of the human family and the Soul of Humanity
*     proposal to reform the United Nations, the World Trade Organization, the World Bank, the IMF, NAFTA, FTAA, and to centralize them under the Global Community, and these organizations will be asked to pay a global tax to be administered by the Global Community
*     the Peace Movement of the Global Community and shelving of the war industry from humanity
*         a global regulatory framework for capitals and corporations that emphasizes global corporate ethics, corporate social responsibility, protection of global rights, the environment, community and family aspects, safe working conditions, fair wages and sustainable consumption aspects
*     the ruling by the Earth Court of Justice of the abolishment of the debt of the poor or developing nations as it is really a form of global tax to be paid annually by the rich or industrialized nations to the developing nations
*     establishing freshwater and clean air as primordial human rights


D)    Portal of sustainable development

It is now mecessary to create the PROFESSIONAL WORLD CENTER FOR STRATEGY OF SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT. The Centre would a portal for LIFE IN STATE OF CHANGE and would aim at the sustainable development of all people, develop a comprehensive vision for the future of humanity, help poverty eradication, change consumption and production patterns.

The Global Community needs to build up a widely and freely accessible world information network. This network could serve to provide monitoring, forecasting and early warning and thus help to implement the principles of sustainable development(SD). This initiative aims to take up, on a global scale, the building of the information basis for SD-policy and SD-economy. A priority should be given to the process of creation of a commonly accessible, world-wide system of:

-     comprehensive monitoring;
-     far-sighted forecasting and
-     measurable evaluation

Such a SD-information system should be globally-integrated and territorially distributed. In order to bring about the creation of such an information system, it is essential to carry out a large-scale operation, requiring appropriate developments in science, technology and society at large. Due to the lack of such an information foundation for the global and local governance, a covert or overt struggle for access to scarce and shrinking natural resources will inevitably grow and accelerate the crisis. This crisis, if unchecked, will lead to a global catastrophe. The deficit of these resources should, and, we believe can, be eliminated through international cooperation, which should replace the existing competition. That, however, requires not only political will, but also the deepening of a comprehensive and easily accessible knowledge about the consequences of human actions and inactions.

E)     A democratically planned global economy - Societal Sustainability

The Global Community promotes a democratically planned global economy - Societal Sustainability - a democratically planned global economy with built-in mechanisms for optimum input and oversight guaranteed to all nations.

Human cooperation marshalling with meaning and purpose previously untapped energy and resources on a worldwide scale provides the driving force for achieving and sustaining a planned global economy democratically embarked upon by all member-states of the United Nations. It would offer the world community a rational, effective response to impending trade wars and other instances of human despair arising from the contradiction between free trade practices and national job protectionism. Launching a democratically planned global economy at the earliest practicable time will bypass the thirty-year time frame projected for equalizing labor costs between underdeveloped national economies and those of the more developed national economies - while reversing the deterioration of social and environmental conditions traceable to an economic system increasingly antithetical to global unity and human aspirations.

F)     Long term well-being as a solution to world sustainable development

Solutions to world problems can be found by setting our sights on long term well-being. That is, by aiming to involve everyone who needs sustenance in a system that:

*     manages necessary materials in continuous cycles,
*    uses renewable energy and
*     eliminates harmful waste.

It is a question of direction.

G)     Societal sustainability is really about symbiotical relationships

Today, serious attention is being given to the concept or ideal of community participation in resource management. Nevertheless, there is still much confusion or doubt as to what really constitutes meaningful participation and who specifically should participate.

To ensure that genuine participation at the local community level, there is a need to recognize and build upon local knowledge and existing local resource management practices. There is also the need to recognize that participation is a continuous process of negotiation and decision-making with room for more input as the process unfolds. Effective participation must involve some genuine power on the part of the participants to influence the outcome of the processes they are involved in. Also, the local community must be able to define their own ends and establish a firm sense of community ownership of the project itself.

Societal sustainability is really about symbiotical relationships. The emphasis of a global symbiotical relationship is not so much on how much money a nation should have or how high a GDP should be although money can be made a part of the relationship. We all know developed countries live off developing countries so the emphasis has no need to stress out the profit a rich nation is making off a poor nation. The emphasis of the relationship should give more importance to the other aspects such as quality of life, protection of the environment and of the global life-support systems, the entrenchment of the Scale of Global Rights and the Charter of the Global Community into our ways of life, justice, peace, cultural and spiritual freedom, security, and many other important aspects as described in the global ministries (health, agriculture, energy, trade, resources, etc.).

A typical global symbiotical relationship between people, institutions, cities, provinces and nations of the world may be what a group of people, together, wants it to be. It can be a group of people with the same values. It can be a group of people with the same cultural background, or the same religious background. Or it can be people with different values, cultural background or religious values and beliefs. The people making a global community may be living in many different locations on the planet. With today's communications it is easy to group people in this fashion. It can be a village, or two villages together where people have decided to unite as one global community. The two villages may be found in different parts of the world. It can be a town, a city, or a nation. It can be two or more nations together. A global community could be a group of Africans, maybe NGOs, or maybe businesses, in one(or several) of the nations of Africa, who decided to unite with another group(s), or businesses, situated in Canada, or elsewhere in the world. Together they can grow as a global community and be strong and healthy.

A global symbiotical relationship between two or more nations, or between two or more global communities, can have trade as the major aspect of the relationship or it can have as many other aspects as agreed by the people involved. The fundamental criteria is that a relationship is created for the good of all groups participating in the relationship and for the good of humanity, all life on Earth. The relationship allows a global equitable and peaceful development.

Any symbiotical relationship is for the good of all, for the good of the 'other'. It is based on a genuine group concern and unconditional support for the individual's well-being ~ a giant leap in human behaviour. The question is how can we improve the political symbiotical relationship to fulfill its goals? The Charter of the Global Community promotes the values to achieve its goals. These goals require the promoting and establishment of: global community ethics, mutual respect, respect for life, basic liberties, justice and equity, caring for the 'other', integrity, responsibility and accountability.

Other symbiotical relationships may be based on common concerns and issues such as: the environment, peace, justice, women's rights, global rights, and many more. There is a whole spectrum of possible symbiotical relationships.

Symbiotical relationships are needed today for the long term future of humanity and for the protection of life on Earth.

On the other hand, a global symbiotical relationship between two or more nations can have trade as the major aspect of the relationship or it can have as many other aspects as agreed by the nations involved.

Intrinsic human cooperation at the core of creative cultural evolution promises to give rise to a new epoch for humanity defined by societal sustainability and lasting world peace. The biological basis for human cooperation and symbiotical relationships both validate and underlie evolutionary panaltruism in and beyond the twenty-first century. Twenty-first century education centered on human empathy and compassion and a terror-free global community by the year 2010 garners important impetus from The Golden Rule principle.

The Golden Rule principle, also called the Ethic of Reciprocity by theologians, says: "Dont do to others what you wouldn't want done to you." Or treat others the way you would want to be treated. The Golden Rule has a moral aspect found in each religion or faith. It could be used as a global ethic. Paul McKenna, a writer in interfaith dialogue, has found analogues for the golden rule in 13 faiths. These 13 analogue statements are passages found in the scriptures or writings that promote this ethos. Every faith is unanimous of saying that every individual should be treated with the same respect and dignity we all seek for ourselves. As a first step in bringing together religious leaders all around the world, the Global Community is presenting here 13 statements that unify us all in one Golden Rule.

A new symbiotical relationship between religion and the protection of the global life-support systems has begun to take place all over the world. Religious rituals now support the conservation efforts and play a central role in governing sustainable use of the natural environment.

Major faiths are issuing declarations, advocating for new national policies, and creating educational activities in support of a sustainable global community. The Global Community is establishing a symbiotical relationship between spirituality and science, between our heart and mind, and God, between religion and the environment.

The human family is finding its role in the universe, a higher purpose and a meaning. We now can celebrate life.

A sustainable world can be built with the help of a very powerful entity: the human spirit. Community participation generates the energy needed to sustain the planet and all life. Religious and environmental communities have formed a powerful alliance for sustainability. Our next objective will be to find statements from all religions that promote the respect, stewardship, protection, ethical and moral responsibility to life and of the environment, the Earth global life-support systems, and statements that promote a responsible Earth management. We are also asking for specific statements on environmental conservation such as those expressed by the Islamic religion.

Societal sustainability in addressing international terrorism and the creation of a democratically planned global economy marshals previously untapped human cooperation, energy, and resources. Investigating, understanding, and eradicating the root causes of international terrorism entails objective analyses of all social dichotomies ranging in realm from religious dogmas, to political ideologies, to economic systems.

Native Spirituality
We are as much alive as we keep the Earth alive.
Chief Dan George

Sikhism
I am a stranger to no one; and no one is a stranger to me. Indeed, I am a friend to all.
Guru Granth Sahib, pg. 1299

Christianity
In everything, do to others as you would have them do to you; for this is the law and the prophets.
Jesus, Matthews 7:12

BaHa'I Faith
Lay not on any soul a load that you would not wish to be laid upon you, and desire not for anyone the things you would not desire for yourself.
Baha'ullah, Gleanings

Judaism
What is hateful to you, do not do to your neighbour. This is the whole Torah; all the rest is commentary.
Hillel, Talmud, Shabbat 31a

Buddhism
Treat not others in ways that you yourself would find hurtful.
Udana-Varga 5.18

Islam
Not one of you truly believes until you wish for others what you wish for yourself.
The Prophet Muhammad, Hadith

Taoism
Regard your neighbour's gain as your own gain, and your neighbour's loss as your own loss.
T'ai Shang Kan Ying P'ien, 213-218

Hinduism
This is the sum of duty: do not do to others what would cause pain if done to you.
Mahabharata 5:1517

Confucianism
One word which sums up the basis of all good conduct...loving kindness. Do not do to others what you do not want done to yourself.
Confucius, Analeets, 15.23

Jainism
One should treat all creatures in the world as one would like to be treated.
Mahavira,Sutrakritanga

Unitarianism
We affirm and promote respect for the interdependent web of all existence of which we are a part.
Unitarian principle

Zoroastrianism
Do not do unto others whatever is injurious to yourself.
Shayast-na-Shayast, 13.29

H)     Same-sex marriages

The only way proponents for same-sex marriages will win their rights is if they protest, mobilize, organize and build such a powerful, militant movement from below that politicians cannot ignore them! Finally, it is important to say: We can NOT win alone. But if we unite our struggle with union members fighting to preserve their jobs, with women fighting to defend abortion rights, with people of color defending affirmative action, then we can! We need to get together in a mighty front for civil, labor and human rights on an international scale. The problems of this world know no borders and neither can we. Working people, women, people of color, immigrants, gays, lesbians, transgenders and transsexuals--altogether we are not a minority or a "special interest" group! We are the mighty, powerful majority!



Chapter 20.23     Forest industry and paper manufacturing
Article 1:   
Chapter 20.24     Establisment of global symbiotical relationships
Article 1:   
See also Chapter 7, Chapter 23.3.2, and Article 7 of Chapter 10.1.
Chapter 20.25     Global Exhibition
The Global Exhibition

Article 1:   The establishment of the concept of the Global Exhibition
For the first time ever in the world the concept of the Global Exhibition has been established by the Global Community Global Parliament. It has been a part of Global Dialogue 2005.

There will be a Global Exhibition at the time of each Global Dialogue. It will also be occurring everywhere in the world along with the Global Dialogue. The Global Exhibition is a replacement to the usual Trade Show we have been promoting during each previous Global Dialogue. The Program to the Global Exhibition will be a part of the Final program of each Global Dialogue.
Article 2:   The goal of the Global Exhibition
The Global Exhibition must allow multiplicity, diversity and contradiction to exist inside the structure of an exhibition ... a world where the conflicts of globalization are met by the romantic dreams of a new modernity, a new federation of nations.
Article 3:   The contents of the Global Exhibition
The Global Exhibition covers many aspects. It can be about creating high profile, highly targeted business and consumer exhibitions, where buyers and suppliers from around the world can come together to do business. In an increasingly digital age, nothing can replace the power of human contact for establishing and maintaining business relations. And with more market leading exhibitions than any other organiser, no organiser delivers more business contacts. We specialize in exhibitions, trade shows, conferences and event planning.

We divide the Global Exhibition into "platforms"--conferences and lecture series engaging figures from a wide range of disciplines--that take place at different communities around the world over the course of the year leading up to the installation in a large Global Exhibition in one country.

Getting to know one another and ourselves as one humanity.

Unity in diversity


The Global Exhibition must allow multiplicity, diversity and contradiction to exist inside the structure of an exhibition ... a world where the conflicts of globalization are met by the romantic dreams of a new modernity, a federation of nations.


Article 4:   Social, educational, artistic, political, religious and economic aspects of the Global Exhibition
would certainly plan to promote many aspects such as:

1.     Global Parliament and its Global Constitution
2.     Earth flag
3.     Celebration of Life Day
4.     the Global Community
5.     the Global Dialogue
6.     the Portal of the Global Community
7.     the Global Community Citizenship (every participant would become a global citizen)
8.     the Certified Corporate Global Community Citizenship (CCGCC)
9.     the ECO Award and have an Award Ceremonies
10.     actions for the good of all as per the Statement of Rights, Responsibilities, and Accountabilities of the Global Community citizens
11.     a global co-operation between nations
12.     Humanity's new vision of the world
13.     global societal sustainability
14.     global governance and Earth management
15.     the Global Community overall picture (6 world regions approach and hundreds of issues)
16.     the global life-support systems
17.     the Global Community Assessment Centre (GCAC)
18.     all educational, cultural, political, social and religious aspects

Article 5:   The issues of the Global Exhibition
Nothing in contemporary art speaks so directly to all of these issues as the large scale exhibition as well as any number of other biennials that cropped up around the world during the past decade. The Global Exhibition, endowed with a transnational circuitry, assumed the unique position of reflecting the idea of a world government. Establishing a new curatorial class able to bring artists together from wide-ranging geographic and cultural points, the large-scale exhibition alterd the kinds of visibility afforded artists and so fundamentally changed the conditions of artistic discussion, ultimately forwarding the position that no show could, or should, presume an all-encompassing thesis--at least not in conventional terms and form. Rather, the exhibition extends through time and across geography to include panels, lectures, publications, performances, and public works that fall welt beyond the parameters of the traditional show, and lies well beyond the grasp of any single viewer. In turn, these exhibitions have come to marshal the forces of any number of disciplines, including art history and theory, which leads one to the question of whether the critical function is in some sense migrating from critic to curator, or indeed whether such nominal distinctions are useful at all. At this level, I think that many people correspond to the economic, social, and cultural figure of the 'artist' as it has been constituted in the modern age."

Global Parliament aims at replacing the United Nations. That is truly a Revolution. If true revolution changes the rules on how to change the rules, then we must arrive at terms that transform the very concept of the exhibition. Although a few criteria for inclusion based on identity and geopolitics have developed, the art world is still heavily commodified, and an artist without a sales (and therefore publicity) base in the developed word--or a curatorial support network in the world's "periphery"--is not going to be included. Further, the new terms of engagement may be geopolitical, but work from the "First World" must have a powerful aesthetic surplus or an antically unrecognizable political dimension in order to gain access. So many artists are doing serious work with directly political themes but do not see themselves included in these shows--and would not expect themselves to be-since the public visiting such exhibitions is not their audience of interest. Granted, the flattened terrain of modern communications is bringing the interlocking worlds of art production and display into closer proximity, so it would not be correct to claim that work with direct political address will always be left out. But is it still necessary to point out that while "geopolitical" can have the cover of a prefix to cover its political nature, the politics in question bad better be far, far away?

Article 6:   The art world and the Global Exhibition
The art world--a congeries of professional services along the lines of dentists, doctors, and professors on the one hand and high-end showrooms like ear dealerships on the other--consistently offers the modernizing elite a compass for understanding cultural and social "facts" as they impinge on their consciousness. The global exhibitions serve as grand collectors and translators of subjectivities under the latest phase of globalization. But as we move between disparate colonialist eras, what is plain about the present moment is that there is no dearth of images of the colonized Other in public view, despite only a little more insight--and that quite momentary--into the interior lives of others than in the previous colonial moment. The elite in question, especially in the North and in developed industrial and postindustrial nations (which includes, perhaps, the antipodean South), may have a taste for edification via these new Crystal Palace expositions. And why not?

Chapter 20.26     Manufacturing sector
Article 1:   
Chapter 20.27     Energy industry
Article 1:   
Chapter 20.28     War industry
Article 1:   
Chapter 20.29     Communications
Article 1:   
Chapter 20.30     Transportation sector
Article 1:   
Chapter 20.31     Media industry and education
Article 1:    GLOBALIZATION, MEDIA AND MERGERS: the Impact on Youth and Education
Over the past 50 years, thousands of conducted studies - public inquiries among them - have demonstrated how mass media are instrumental in the socialization of youth. These studies have focussed on numerous themes, among them sexual exploitation and graphic depictions of violent imagery. More recently, the focus has shifted to the commercial exploitation of children due to sedentary lifestyles and diets heavy in junk foods leading to health problems such as obesity, heart disease and juvenile diabetes. Marketing is now an intense and pervasive presence in children's lives with connections between movies and products that surface both in the home and in the school. Indeed, it is often argued that television and other converging forms of communications technologies are the most powerful educators the world has ever known.

Many of these studies demonstrate that media coalesce into a seamless, pervasive and increasingly centralized, homogenized and globalized cultural environment that is drifting out of democratic reach. Among these trends, is the growing reliance on violence in popular culture as a cheap commercial ingredient that sells well in a global economy and translates easily into any language. Children, adolescents and young adults are the target audience for most of these cultural commodities. Youth video game players are now encouraged to get in touch with their "gun-toting, cold-blooded murdering side".

Evidence accumulates that our collective, immune system to violence is breaking down, yet strategies for change remain hamstrung by quaint and dated interpretations of freedom of expression. While it is important that the basic integrity of the free press be protected, short sighted extension of the principle to protect the profit driven agendas of media conglomerates who now have a firm grip on the value systems of the next generation must be challenged. Such a mind set is incompatible with long term cultural and natural environmental sustainability.

Strategies are required at all levels of government and in all sectors of society if a new age of global co-operation with a vision for caring for all forms of life on earth is to be achieved. Educational initiatives such as media literacy courses in schools continue to be needed but these must go beyond mere definition of problems. They should focus on new challenges posed in an era of rapid communications technologies and converging content. They must also be made available to adults as well as children in order that those in the best position to provide leadership for meaningful change in society can better understand the links between our new information based global economy and the commercial exploitation of youth. Only when we begin to recognize the futility of short term band-aid measures and endless inquires that end up collecting dust in the offices of academics, will we begin to make progress toward sound, integrated public policy on health, education, community safety, national security, environmental sustainability and a new age civilization.

Chapter 20.32     Conservation strategies for natural ecosystems
Article 1:    Economic valuation as a framework incentive to enforce profit-based conservation strategies for natural ecosystems.
Traditional biological conservation management practice based on protected areas (PAs) has proved unable to achieve the required conservation levels for PAs with residents, located near population centres and with good access, especially within a low or middle income country context. One of the reasons for this relative failure is that biodiversity in general and PAs in particular do not usually exist in isolation and independent of human activities. For local communities, the act of conservation becomes a misfortune rather than an opportunity for sustainable development leading to increasing evasion of conservation regulations while governments delay in coming up with answers to the growing conservation problems resulting from such individual actions. This is the reason we believe conservation practice has to change deeply. It must not rely only on the Safe Minimum Standard Principle (SMS) and command-and-control instruments but must instead engage local residents and other users thus creating a broad consensus over the existence and objectives of conservation initiatives. One way of achieving this is to make people adopt profit-based conservation practices. This is by no means easy for policy-makers being replete with social, scientific and practical difficulties and ambiguities.

There are advantages and disadvantages of using an ecosystem economic valuation as an incentive measure for enforcing local community co-operation in conservation decisions and management. The utilitarian approach allows value to arise in a number of ways depending on individual use of ecosystems. Hence, economists have generally settled for taxonomy of total ecosystem value interpreted as Total Economic Value (TEV) that distinguishes between Direct Use Values and Passive (Non-use) Values. TEV is a relative value and an answer mostly expressed in monetary terms to a carefully defined question in which two alternatives are compared. This answer depends on elements of choice defining the prevailing context. As ecosystems are not purchased on markets, one has to elicit individual preferences directly by the use of questionnaires such as Contingent Valuation (CV) to assess the individual WTP and WTA relevant monetary measures. Complex criteria and rules of evidence¡± such as those suggested by the NOAA Panel must be applied to guarantee the reliability and validity of the CV data. To calculate TEV based on individual CV data and the asset analogy, time and uncertainty have to be considered when discounting service flows. One concludes that TEV may be a useful tool as an incentive, a support for decision-making, and as a tool for education and information. The fact of being a very abstract instrument, and very demanding from the theoretical and technical points of view, becomes an advantage. To date, it is still the only existing, carefully defined and applied and somehow reliable way of society knowing how much an ecosystem is worth within a market-based scenario.


 




Back to top of page


Copyright © 2009 Global Community WebNet Ltd.Global Community WebNet Ltd