The Global Community has had work on the global economy aspects and issues ever since 1985. A short list of our previous work on the global economy aspects and issues. A short list of our previous work on the global economy aspects and issues is shown here

For more recent work on the global economy aspects and issues read the following table.

 Month/year  Theme and Author  Read contents
 November 29, 2007   Labor Goes to Bali: Unions Ready to Take on Global Warming
by Brendan Smith and Jeremy Brecher and Tim Costello, Global Labor Strategies
AlterNet, The Mix is the Message, ForeignPolicy
The devastating realities of climate change, and the scientific consensus around its cause and cure, are shifting the global political climate.
Some people might say you are anti-business. Is that the case?
This week trade unionists from around the world will travel to Bali for the December 3rd launch of negotiations for a successor to the Kyoto Protocol limiting greenhouse gasses. It will include delegates from such U.S unions as the Electrical Workers (IUE), Mine Workers, Service Employees, Boilermakers, Steelworkers, Communication Workers, Transport Workers (TWU), and UNITE HERE garment and textile workers. It will also include the AFL-CIO Industrial Union Council as well as such labor-oriented groups as the Blue-Green Alliance, the Cornell Global Labor Institute, and the Labor Research Association. The Kyoto Protocol was signed by 172 countries - not including the U.S. The AFL-CIO, which then represented the great majority of all U.S. unions, opposed the Kyoto protocol. What will be the stance of American labor toward an even stronger version for the future?
As trade unionists, we are confident that Bali will mark the beginning of a new and more ambitious process of social change, where our collective hearts and minds must aspire to save our planet, on the basis of solidarity and mutual respect.
  Read Labor Goes to Bali: Unions Ready to Take on Global Warming
 November 14, 2007   Palm oil: Cooking the Climate Once you pop, you can't stop
by Greenpeace Canada
Indonesia — If, as you read this, you're tucking into a KitKat or dipping into a tube of Pringles, you might be interested to know that these products contain palm oil that is linked to the destruction of forests and peatlands in Indonesia. As our new report "How the palm oil industry is cooking the climate" shows, it's a recipe for disaster. The manufacturers of these products - Nestlé, Procter & Gamble, and Unilever - are sourcing their palm oil from suppliers who aren't picky about where they site their plantations. As the volunteers at the Forest Defenders Camp in Sumatra have seen, this includes tearing up areas of pristine forest then draining and burning the peatlands. Indonesia's peatlands act as huge carbon stores so replacing them with plantations them not only threatens the amazing biodiversity, including the rare Sumatran tiger, it also releases huge volumes of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere. They only cover 0.1 per cent of the land on Earth, but thanks in part to the activities of the palm oil industry they contribute 4 per cent to global emissions. If expansion of the palm oil industry continues unabated, that figure can only rise. What's to be done? The Indonesian government should urgently introduce a moratorium on forest and peatland destruction, which will provide a chance to develop long-term solutions and prevent further emissions from deforestation. And our eyes are fixed firmly on the UN climate meeting in Bali next month, where the next phase of the Kyoto Protocol will be discussed. With deforestation accounting for up to a fifth of global emissions, including financing for forest protection as a core part of the plan to tackle climate change is essential.
  Read Palm oil: Cooking the Climate Once you pop, you can't stop
 November 27, 2007   UNDP wants climate justice through trade
published by Indian Society For Sustainable Agriculture and by Indian Express Newspapers (Mumbai) Ltd.

The UN Development Programme (UNDP) for the first time in its human development report has analysed the impact of climate change. The Human Development Report 2007-08 – Fighting climate change : Human solidarity in a divided world is released at a time when the climate change agenda is slowly gaining its entry in the WTO negotiations and the discussions on the review of the work under Kyoto Protocol is slated to take place in Bali in Indonesia in December, this year. The report documented the impact of climate change across the world also projected the likely scenario for the future. Making out a case for alternative sources of energy and fuels like bio-fuels, the UNDP report said that global trade has a major role to play. It said :
International trade could play a much larger role in the expanding Markets for alternative fuels. Brazil is more efficient than either the European Union or the United States in producing ethanol, Moreover, sugar-based ethanol is more efficient in cutting carbon emissions. The problem is that imports of Brazilian ethanol are restricted by high import tariffs. Removing these tariffs would generate gains not just for Brazil, but for climate change mitigation.
Negotiations on emissions limits for the post-2012 Kyoto Protocol commitment period can – and must – frame the global carbon budget. Saying so it noted most developed countries like Canada fell short of the targets. Though the European Union and UK have both embraced their targets, they are likely to fall far short of the goals set unless they move rapidly to put climate mitigation at the center of energy policy reform. Two major OECD countries like US and Australia are not bound by Kyoto Protocol. The report suggested two ways to mitigate climate change, one is to directly tax carbon dioxide emission and the other is cap-and-trade. Under cap-and-trade system, the government sets an overall emissions cap and issues tradable allowances that grant business the right to emit a set amount. Those who can reduce emissions more cheaply are able to sell allowances. One potential disadvantage of cap-and-trade is energy price instability while the potential advantage is environmental certainty, it noted. While the transition to climate protecting energy and life styles will have short-term costs, there may be economic benefits beyond what what is to be achieved by stabilizing temperatures. These benefits are likely to be realized through Keynesian and Schumpeterian mechanisms with new incentives for massive investment stimulating overall demand and creative destruction leading to innovation and productivity jumps in a wide array of sectors, the foreward to the report said. While government leadership is going to be essential in correcting the huge externality that is climate change, Markets and prices will have to be put to work so that private sector decisions can lead more naturally to optimal investment and production decisions.
  Read UNDP wants climate justice through trade
 November 11, 2007   Global warming speeds up: IPCC
published by Indian Society For Sustainable Agriculture and by Indian Express Newspapers (Mumbai) Ltd.

The UN secretary-general, Ban Ki-moon urged the national governments to do more to arrest the climate change. The report also offered blueprints to avert the worst catastrophes, he said and added that climate change imperils the most precious treasures of our planet. Ki-moon said that the report would be placed before the forthcoming UN framework on climate change meeting in Bali in Indonesia to review the progress made under the Kyoto Protocol. The report noted that observational evidence from all continents and most oceans showed that many natural systems were being affected by regional climate changes, particularly rise in temperatures. Global atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide, methane and nitrous oxide have increased markedly as a result of the human activities since 1750 and now far exceed pre-industrial value determined from ice cores spanning many thousands of years.
  Read Global warming speeds up: IPCC
 November 10, 2007   Biotech to figure in new EU-India S&T cooperation
published by Indian Society For Sustainable Agriculture and by Indian Express Newspapers (Mumbai) Ltd.

Biotechnology in agriculture, bio-fuel, climate change and energy security are top on the agenda of the European Union’s new offer for science and technology cooperation with India. I am confident that we are embarking upon a new eara in science and technology cooperation between the European Union and India. Our S&T cooperation agreement is about to be renewed for a further 5 years and we are about to announce new exciting opportunities for collaborative research, which may include biotechnology in agriculture, bio-fuel, climate change, energy security and computational material science. We will establish a road map of our strategic S&T cooperation for 2008 and beyond.
  Read Biotech to figure in new EU-India S&T cooperation
 November 19, 2007   Globalisation Or Militarist Imperialism? India Must Choose: the Indo-US nuclear deal
by Rohini Hensman,,
If India wishes to be a respected member of the international community, it would need to uphold international law. This would entail working with other countries to outlaw weapons of mass destruction (chemical, biological and nuclear weapons, including Depleted Uranium weapons), as well as weapons that target civilians, such as land mines and cluster bombs, all of which violate international law by failing to confine their effects to military targets. Obviously this would imply halting the nuclear weaponisation programme in India.
It is easy to understand why the current US administration is so desperate to seal a strategic alliance with India, at a time when Pakistan, its traditional ally in South Asia, appears to be faltering. For India, however, the deal would be a disaster. Backing out of it under pressure from public opinion may be embarrassing, but not shameful; on the contrary, it is the only democratic option. Going through with it, on the other hand, would be detrimental to India in the multifarious ways outlined above. Clearly, the democratic option is both the wisest and the only honourable one.
  Read Globalisation Or Militarist Imperialism? India Must Choose
 November 2, 2007  
Eco-Humanism and Popular System Dynamics as Preconditions for Sustainable Development

by Leslaw Michnowski
Manage the Sustainable Development Global Information Society website.
Committee for Futures Studies "Poland 2000 Plus", Polish Academy of Sciences

Luis T. Gutierrez, Editor of the Solidarity & Sustainability, Non-Violence homepage says the following about the book. The invited article this month is contributed by Leslaw Michnowski, a member of the Committee for Futures Studies "Poland 2000 Plus," Polish Academy of Sciences. In this paper, which is a synopsis of his recently published book on his vision for a sustainable development process "with a human face," he identifies the ingredients that will be required to assure a future for humanity and the human habitat. The reader is warned that this paper is not intended for casual, easy reading. Michnowski's intent is to define the information/knowledge infrastructure that will be required, the technologies to be used, and the principles of solidarity and social justice to be adhered to, in order to face the inevitable global crises now emerging as a consequence of the pervasive human misbehavior, socially and environmentally, triggered by (most recently) the industrial revolution. The reader will notice the congruence between this article and some of the issues and concerns discussed in page 1. The vision presented here is one that shows the need for a global transition toward a new order of things, one in which technology and other resources are used to balance individual interests with the common good. It is shown that it is a feasible vision, one that can be achieved if the humans who populate the planet make a decision to overcome obsolete mindsets that seek the accumulation of wealth and power as the only path to "happiness." The impending global crisis may trigger a sequence of events that forces making such decisions in the midst of turmoil and much suffering. Let us pray and work for a transition from homo economicus to homo solidarius. It may be painful, but it can be peaceful. This is the path of truth, freedom, and care; the path toward a better world for our children and grandchildren. This is the only path of sure hope.
This article is an overview of a book by the author: "VISION OF A SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT SOCIETY – THE FUTURE OF THE WORLD FROM THE CYBERNETICIST PERSPECTIVE” (in Polish), published by Polish Academy of Sciences, Committee for Futures Studies "Poland 2000 Plus", Warsaw, Poland, 2006. This book contains his conclusions from many years of research on the current global crisis. This definitive work is based on the author’s System of Life evidence-based model that couples the realities of globalization and information technology with the urgent need to identify and analyze the conditions for transitioning the worldwide human community toward a new worldwide civilization that uses information and knowledge for sustainable development and, in particular, sustainable human development.
  Read World - Grid Type, Continuously Under-development - System Dynamics. Why do we need it?
 October 3, 2007  
Scrap Special Export Zones (SEZs), Promote Agri Export Zones (AEZs)
by Dr. Krishan Bir Chaudhary
I have written an article on how big Corporate houses are grabbing farmlands from farmers in India at a platter. This is due to the government policy of Corporate pampering, ignoring the food security of the nation. As per the National Rural Labour Commission, an average agricultural worker gets 159 days of work in a year; and as per NSSO (2005), the average daily wage of agricultural labour in rural areas is around Rs. 51. Considering this, the estimated 82,000 agricultural labourers' households will lose Rs. 67-crore in wages. And put together, the total loss of income to the farming and the farm worker families is to the tune of Rs. 212-crore (Rs 2120 million) a year. For the marginalized, the loss of income – even if it hovers around the poverty line – has disastrous implications. Farmland is the economic security for farmers and farm labourers.
  Read Scrap Special Export Zones (SEZs), Promote Agri Export Zones (AEZs)
 October 22, 2007   It’s The Oil
by Jim Holt,, London Review Of Books

Iraq has 115 billion barrels of known oil reserves. That is more than five times the total in the United States. And, because of its long isolation, it is the least explored of the world’s oil-rich nations. A mere two thousand wells have been drilled across the entire country; in Texas alone there are a million. It has been estimated, by the Council on Foreign Relations, that Iraq may have a further 220 billion barrels of undiscovered oil; another study puts the figure at 300 billion. If these estimates are anywhere close to the mark, US forces are now sitting on one quarter of the world’s oil resources. The value of Iraqi oil, largely light crude with low production costs, would be of the order of $30 trillion at today’s prices. For purposes of comparison, the projected total cost of the US invasion/occupation is around $1 trillion. Who will get Iraq’s oil? One of the Bush administration’s ‘benchmarks’ for the Iraqi government is the passage of a law to distribute oil revenues. The draft law that the US has written for the Iraqi congress would cede nearly all the oil to Western companies. The Iraq National Oil Company would retain control of 17 of Iraq’s 80 existing oilfields, leaving the rest – including all yet to be discovered oil – under foreign corporate control for 30 years.
The occupation may seem horribly botched on the face of it, but the Bush administration’s cavalier attitude towards ‘nation-building’ has all but ensured that Iraq will end up as an American protectorate for the next few decades – a necessary condition for the extraction of its oil wealth. If the US had managed to create a strong, democratic government in an Iraq effectively secured by its own army and police force, and had then departed, what would have stopped that government from taking control of its own oil, like every other regime in the Middle East? On the assumption that the Bush-Cheney strategy is oil-centred, the tactics – dissolving the army, de-Baathification, a final ‘surge’ that has hastened internal migration – could scarcely have been more effective. The costs – a few billion dollars a month plus a few dozen American fatalities (a figure which will probably diminish, and which is in any case comparable to the number of US motorcyclists killed because of repealed helmet laws) – are negligible compared to $30 trillion in oil wealth, assured American geopolitical supremacy and cheap gas for voters. In terms of realpolitik, the invasion of Iraq is not a fiasco; it is a resounding success.
  Read It’s The Oil
 October 3, 2007   Scrap Special Export Zones (SEZs), Promote Agri Export Zones (AEZs)
by Dr. Krishan Bir Chaudhary, President
Bharatiya Krishak Samaj (Indian Farmers' Organisation), Indian Society For Sustainable Agriculture And Rural Development, New Delhi, INDIA

see also by same author " Indian Farmer Leader On India-US Pact On GMOs"  Letter sent: Indian Farmer Leader On India-US Pact On GMOs
I have written an article on how big Corporate houses are grabbing farmlands from farmers in India at a platter. This is due to the government policy of Corporate pampering, ignoring the food security of the nation.
  Read  Scrap Special Export Zones (SEZs), Promote Agri Export Zones (AEZs)
 September 16, 2007   SCALE OF CONFLICTS BETWEEN FIRMS, COMMUNITIES, NEW SOCIAL MOVEMENTS AND THE ROLE OF GOVERNMENT , by Jose G. Vargas-Hernández, Global Environment Minister, Global file,, jvargas08@berkeley.ed Research Professor, Mexico
The role of the nation-state is to regulate conflicts between the essential elements, the nation-state, capitalists (firms), laborers and consumers, binding together disparate and conflicting interests. This paper is aimed to review the different levels of scale of conflicts between firms, communities, New Social Movements and the role of government.
  Read or Download full WORD document of Research Paper by author
 September 17, 2007   World - Grid Type, Continuously Under-development - System Dynamics. Why do we need it? , by Leslaw Michnowski, Manage the Sustainable Development Global Information Society website., Committee for Futures Studies "Poland 2000 Plus", Polish Academy of Sciences,
The main goal of the United Nations is realization of sustainable development world society vision. Such society would need to integrate social development with economic development and environmental protection. For this end it is necessary to enable sustained economic growth, internalizing externalities and DECOUPLING the range of economic growth from the range of deficit natural resources depletion growth and degradation of environment. It is necessary also to COUPLE economic growth with popular life-quality growth. To achieve sustainable development OF THE WORLD SOCIETY we have to build, a commonly accessible WORLDWIDE SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT INFORMATION (SYSTEM DYNAMICS) SYSTEM for:
- dynamic monitoring,
- long range forecasting, and
- measurable evaluation,
of policy, economy, work, and other changes effects in life-conditions of human beings and nature in general. I propose a research program aimed at describing conditions of creation such big, grid, multi stage built, information system.
  Read World - Grid Type, Continuously Under-development - System Dynamics. Why do we need it?
 September 12, 2007   What Is Being Stolen From Us All
by Jeff Berg

Once again, this time in Iraq, we see the natural resource wealth of an entire nation enriching none but a criminal class and megacorporations. I will assume a distinction. Once again this is only able to take place as a result of the planned aggression and full cooperation of a government & military that acts as if it is a wholly owned subsidiary of a monied elite. Much the same thing is being done here in Canada but "thanks" to the connivance of significant elements of our corporate and government elite it is being achieved without the need for military force. It should be noted however that to some in the corporate class the missing military element is a major mistake even in Canada as it seriously erodes the huge profit margins possible in war zones and markedly reduces the amount of money that can be transferred from citizens to shareholders in times of military conflict. (The quintessential double dip) Admittedly this is a minority opinion but as Iraq will not be the last to prove not an uninfluential one. Evidence of this influence here in Canada can be seen by the massive increase in expenditures for our military and security industrial complexes over the last few years. NB. Before the Harper government's commitment to a $13 billion increase in military spending Canada’s military spending was the 7th highest in absolute terms in the OECD and 12th overall in the world. If you are skeptical of the claim that Canadians are being all but completely shut out of the benefits of their resource wealth go to the Parkland Institute site and discover for yourself the pitiful fraction the Albertan people receive of their resource wealth compared to the people of Norway. For we the Canadian people the situation is an even crueler joke as we receive even less benefit while at the same time bearing more of the brunt of the economic problems associated with being a resource dollar. Aka. Dutch Disease And it is all Canadians and especially Albertans and even the rest of the world that are at the same time forced to pick up the massive environmental tab even as the profits flee the province and the country.
  Read What Is Being Stolen From Us All

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