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Scale of Human and Earth Rights



Results of comparing the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and charters of nations around the world with the Scale of Human and Earth Rights.
May 2003 Newsletter: C
August 2003 Newsletter: 8F
December 2003 Newsletter: 2.0


Humanity scale of social values.
November 2002 Newsletter: 2Q, 2R
December 2002 Newsletter: 2A, 2E, 2F, 2G, 2H
April 2003 Newsletter: 8D
May 2003 Newsletter: 7B, 7C
July 2003 Newsletter: 6E
August 2003 Newsletter: 8B, 8C


Earth rights and the Scale of Human and Earth Rights.
December 2002 Newsletter: 2G, 2F
January 2003 Newsletter: 2F
February 2003 Newsletter: 2I, 2J, 2K, 2L
August 2003 Newsletter: 8B, 8C

Spirituality, religious beliefs and the protection of the global life-support systems.
October 2002 Newsletter: 7C
November 2002 Newsletter: 2G
December 2002 Newsletter: 2F
April 2003 Newsletter: 8D, 8E
May 2003 Newsletter: 7A


Community rights on the Scale of Human and Earth Rights.
January 2003 Newsletter: 2A
February 2003 Newsletter: 2F


The Scale of Human and Earth Rights was introduced for the first time by members of the Earth Community Organization during the August 2000 World Congress on Managing and Measuring Sustainable Development - Global Community Action 1.

The  Earth Community Organization has developed the Scale of Human and Earth Rights in order of importance with the ecological rights being the most important (they supersede all other rights; and so on down the scale).The Earth Community Organizationhas an ongoing process to improve the fundamental wordings of the Scale of Human and Earth Rights. In order to emphasize the importance of protecting the global life-support systems the first statement on top of the scale was modified to include such a need.

The new wording of the scale is shown here. A complete explanation of the scale can be read at http://globalcommunitywebnet.com/gdufour/HumanEarthRights.htm

Over the past decade, the scale of social values has been researched and developed by the Earth Community Organization (ECO). A report published in the December 2003 Newsletter summarized the research work. Read "Let us now fit the 30 Articles of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and the key rights of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms onto the six sections of the Scale of Human and Earth Rights".

Scale of Human and Earth Rights

Section  1.    Ecological rights and the protection of the global life-support systems
Section  2.    Primordial human rights
  • safety and security
  • have shelter
  • 'clean' energy
  • a 'clean' and healthy environment
  • drink fresh water
  • breath clean air
  • eat a balance diet and
  • basic clothing.

Section  3.    The ecological rights, the protection of the global life-support systems and the primordial human rights of future generations
Section  4.    Community rights and the right that the greatest number of people has by virtue of its number (50% plus one) and after voting representatives democratically
Section  5.    Economic rights (business and consumer rights, and their responsibilities and accountabilities) and social rights (civil and political rights)
Section  6.    Cultural rights and religious rights

The following table illustrates the importance of both the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms. It is made clear how little importance was given to Sections 1,2,3, and 4 of the Scale of human and earth Rights. And it is made clear how urgent it is to replace both the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and Charters from all nations by the Scale of human and earth Rights.

Importance of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms on the Scale of Human and Earth Rights
The total degree of importance is the combine efforts of both the Universal Declaration and the Canadian Charter.
Scale Articles of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights Key rights of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms Total degree of importance
Section 1 parts of Article 3; 1% importance no key rights; 0% importance
1% importance
Section 2 parts of Articles 3,4,5,9,13,14,25; 35% importance parts of Legal Rights; 25%
40%
Section 3 no Articles; 0% no key rights; 0%
0%
Section 4 parts of Articles 16,18,21,29; 5% parts of Mobility Rights; 2%
6%
Section 5 parts of Articles 15,17,20,21,22,23,24,28; 100% parts of Democratic Rights and Equality Rights; 60%
100%
Section 6 parts of articles 26,27; 70% parts of Fundamental Freedoms and Language Rights; 40%
80%


Here is how the degree of importance was obtained. For instance in Section 1 it was found that parts of Article 3 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (see description below)was included as promoting very softly the protection of human life but was not promoting at all the protection of the global life-support systems. Section 1 on the Scale of Human and Earth Rights promotes both the protection of human life and the global life-support systems. No key rights were found in the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms that would promote in any way the protection of human life and that of the global life-support systems. It is a failure of the Canadian Charter to be in line with the Universal Declaration. And it is a failure of both the Universal Declaration and the Canadian Charter to be in line with the Scale of Human and Earth Rights. As a result of this failure, a 1% combine importance was recorded in the table. What this means? It means that neither the Universal Declaration or the Canadian Charter gives any importance to human life and the protection of the global life-support systems. These results are consistent and in agreement with the fact that democracy hardly survive an overpopulation such as is seen in the United States. What happens to the idea of the dignity of the human species if this population growth continues at its present rate? It will be completely destroyed. Democracy cannot survive overpopulation.  Human dignity cannot survive overpopulation.  Convenience and decency cannot survive overpopulation.  As you put more and more people onto the world, the value of life not only declines, it disappears.  It doesn't matter if someone dies, the more people there are, the less one person matters. It would be preferable to split a large population into smaller populations.

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