Social justice issues
Global Information Media editorial page
The Global Community has had work on the social justice aspects and issues ever since 1985. A short list of our previous work on the social justice aspects and issues. A short list of our previous work on social justice aspects and issues is shown here

For more recent work on the social justice aspects and issues read the following table.

 Month/year  Theme and Author  Read contents
 November 22, 2006   The Defense of Spiritual Liberty , by Rene Wadlow , with www.transnational-perspectives.org wadlowz@aol.com   Read The Defense of Spiritual Liberty
 November 21, 2006   IN SEARCH OF AN EVOLVING UNIVERSAL-VALUES COMMON DENOMINATOR, by David Allen Stringer, International Coordinator The Universal Alliance, http://www.universalalliance.org.uk Vision Quester News Agency & Universal Alliance, universalalliance.org@tinyworld.co.uk   Read IN SEARCH OF AN EVOLVING UNIVERSAL-VALUES COMMON DENOMINATOR
 November 18, 2006   Civilization and a sustainble future, by Dave Ewoldt, dave@reststop.net http://www.attractionretreat.org/index.html   Read Civilization and a sustainble future
 November 17, 2006   Civilization and a sustainble future, by Derrick Jensen, derrick@derrickjensen.org   Read Civilization and a sustainble future
 October 27, 2006   Join the Discussion with Feminist Pioneer Eleanor Smeal, by Joe Baker, with Care2 and ThePetitionSite team   Read Join the Discussion with Feminist Pioneer Eleanor Smeal
 October 20, 2006   Behind Closed Doors: The Invisibility Of Domestic Violence, by Lucinda Marshall, with Countercurrents.org   Read Behind Closed Doors: The Invisibility Of Domestic Violence
  June 15, 2006   It's time to do more to end the war in Iraq. Join hunger strike to bring troops back home. by Allison, Dana, Farida, Gael, Jodie, Katie, Medea, Nancy, Rae, Samantha and Tiffany, with CODEPINK. When elected officials finally make a positive move, in both the House and Senate, by passing an amendment against permanent bases in Iraq, the amendment is simply yanked from the bill in the conference committee. If we don't do more to stop the US occupation of Iraq, we will be there for DECADES to come, and our children and children's children will live is a state of perpetual war.  Read It's time to do more to end the war in Iraq. Join hunger strike to bring troops back home.
  April 20, 2006   Report: Iraqi women under siege by by Allison, Dana, Farida, Gael, Jodie, Medea, Nancy, Rae and Tiffany with CODEPINK. The report shows that from 1958 to the 1990s, Iraq provided more rights and freedoms for women and girls than most of its neighbors. Though Saddam Hussein's dictatorial government and 12 years of severe sanctions reduced these opportunities, Iraqi women were active in all aspects of their society. After the occupation, with the exception of women in Iraqi Kurdistan, women's daily lives have been reduced to a mere struggle for survival.  Read Report: Iraqi women under siege

















 
The Defense of Spiritual Liberty

Subject: New Article
Date: Tue, 21 Nov 2006 16:39:30 EST
From: Wadlowz@aol.com
To: globalcommunity@telus.net

Dear Colleague, 25 Nov is the 25th anniversary of the UN Declaration on Religious Liberty. I am sending a short text which you can use to mark the day. With best wishes, Rene Wadlow

The Defense of Spiritual Liberty

25 November is the 25th anniversary of the UN “ Declaration on the Elimination of All Forms of Intolerance and of Discrimination Based on Religion or Belief “. The Declaration was proclaimed on 25 November 1981 and began “Considering that one of the principles of the Charter of the United Nations is that of the dignity and equality inherent in all human beings, and that all Member States have pledged themselves to take joint and separate action in co-operation with the Organization to promote and encourage universal respect for and observance of human rights and fundamental freedoms for all, without distinction as to race, sex, language or religion.”

The Declaration took nearly 20 years of difficult negotiations to draft. Preparation of the declaration began in 1962 and the Declaration was proclaimed in November 1981. Originally, UN negotiators had thought of drafting a single text which would have included the elimination of discrimination based on race, sex, and religion. However, there was too great a diversity of views. It was easier to deal with race because in the 1960s and 1970s in UN circles “race” was only the Apartheid policy of South Africa which everyone was, at least verbally, against.

Religion and belief were more difficult questions. The defense of spiritual liberty has been one of the most persistent of struggles, and there is no area of the world that does not have its martyrs to the cause. The struggle has often been against religious authorities who have wanted to maintain their faith within narrow limits claiming that they alone held the truth. It is significant that the words “dogmatic” “sectarian” and “inquisition” – all arise from the religious vocabulary. The stoning of the prophets and the auto-da-fe have been the answers of religious authorities – and often ordinary believers as well – to new ideas. Today, in most parts of the world, religious organizations can no longer put heretics to death. Now, religious organizations can only try to marginalize those who hold new ideas or to excommunicate them; the inquisition has lost its secular arm.

If religious organizations are no longer able to put to death heretics, the State has taken over the task of establishing orthodoxy and putting heretics to death. Although today, governments are the prime agents of repression against the spiritual life, governments are also timidly building the defenses of spiritual liberty.

The Declaration of 25 November 1981 builds upon Article 18 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights which states that “Everyone has the right to freedom of thought, conscience and religion; this right includes freedom to change his religion or belief, and freedom, either alone or in community with others and in public or private, to manifest his religion or belief in teaching, practice, worship and observance.”

One of the most difficult areas in drafting the Declaration concerned the rights of the child to have “access to education in the matter of religion or belief in accordance with the wishes of his parents and shall not be compelled to receive teaching on religion or belief against the wishes of his parents or legal guardians, the best interests of the child being the guiding principle.” The Declaration went on to state that “ The child shall be protected from any form of discrimination on the grounds of religion or belief. He shall be brought up in a spirit of understanding, tolerance, friendship among peoples, peace and universal brotherhood, respect for freedom of religion or belief of others, and in full consciousness that his energy and talents should be devoted to the service of his fellow men.”

Despite the rather undramatic title of the Declaration, it is a milestone on the path of spiritual liberty. Thanks to the Declaration on the Elimination of All Forms of Intolerance and of Discrimination Based on Religion or Belief, we who work for a world of understanding and solidarity have a UN text on which to base our efforts to defend spiritual liberty. Its 25th anniversary should remind us of the important tools we have at hand.

Rene Wadlow is the editor of the online journal of world politics

www.transnational-perspectives.org and the representative to the

United Nations, Geneva, of the Association of World Citizens.

 
Report 1



Back to top of page



 
Report 2



Back to top of page



 
Report 3



Back to top of page

 

Contact Information

Telephone
250-754-0778
Postal address
186 Bowlsby Street, Nanaimo, British Columbia, Canada V9R 5K1
Electronic mail
General Information:
GlobalConstitution@telus.net GlobalConstitution@telus.net
globalcommunity@telus.net globalcommunity@telus.net

Webmaster: gdufour@globalcommunitywebnet.com gdufour@globalcommunitywebnet.com

 

Back to top of page


Send mail to GlobalConstitution@telus.net with questions or comments about the Global Constitution. Your mail
Send comments about website to webmaster at gdufour@globalcommunitywebnet.com Webmaster

Copyright 2005 Global Community WebNet Ltd.Global Community WebNet Ltd