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Research Paper(s)

Germain Dufour

The following abstracts will introduce you to the actual research and Papers now being submitted. You will read about my research Papers by connecting to

http://globalcommunitywebnet.com/gdufour99/Index.html


Measurement of the local/global indicators GESDI and GSDP


A Scale of Values for Assessment of the Four Levels of Concerns: Environment, Economic Development, Availability of Resources, as part of GESDI and GSDP


A unique, more relevant global dialogue on the Management of Global Changes


The Global Community Assessment Centre is part of a unique organization created to better link scientific understanding to effective policy solutions to global changes

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Measurement of the local/global indicators GESDI and GSDP

The concept of Sustainable Development was presented for the first time in 1987 by the World Commission on Environment and Development, in the report Our Common Future . The commission was created by the United Nations, and was made of 21 nations, including Canada. The commission, headed by Norwegian Prime Minister Gro Harlem Brundtland, said that the planet needs " a new era of environmentally sustainable sound economic development. Dr. Brundtland also said that government must strongly support "a new political approach to environment and development, where economic and fiscal policies, trade and foreign policies, energy, agriculture, industry, and other sectorial policies, all aim to induce development that is not only economically but ecologically sustainable."

Beginning in 1987, the author of the present paper has researched and developed the complete definition of Sustainable Development as well as creating a method of measurement. The technical definition of Sustainable Development was given as being:

"a sound balance among the interactions of the impacts (positive and/or negative), or stresses, on the four major quality systems: People, Economic Development, Environment and Availability of Resources."

The non-technical definition was given as being:

"a sound balance among the interactions designed to create a healthy economic growth, preserve environmental quality, make wise use of our resources, and enhance social benefits."

An evaluation of sustainable development consists of ranking risks relative to each other and to help deciding which practice is better than another. In 1988, the author has developed a scale of values, and has designed and tested indicators to represent quality of development. Hundreds of indicators were measured and integrated into an overall expression called the Gross Environmental Sustainable Development Index (GESDI). GESDI was developed to measure sustainable development locally and globally. It expresses the quality of our growth or development, and it describes environmental quality rather than merely measuring different environmental variables.

An other indicator was developed to measure the costs of development: the Gross Sustainable Development Product (GSDP).

The GSDP is defined as the total value of production within a region over a specified period of time. It is measured using market prices for goods and services transactions in the economy. The GSDP is designed to replace the Gross Development product (GDP) as the primary indicator of the economic performance of a nation. The GSDP takes into accounts:

∑ the economic impacts of environmental and health degradation or improvement, resource depletion or findings of new stocks, and depreciation or appreciation of stocks;
∑ the impact of people activity on the environment, the availability of resources, and economic development;
∑ the "quality" of the four major quality systems and the impacts of changes in these systems on national income and wealth;
∑ global concerns and their impacts on the economy;
∑ the welfare, economic development and quality of life of future generations;
∑ expenditures on pollution abatement and clean-ups, people health, floods, vehicle accidents, and on any negative impact costs;
∑ the status of each resource and the stocks and productive capacities of exploited populations and ecosystems, and make sure that those capacities are sustained and replenished after use; and
∑ the depreciation or appreciation of natural assets, the depletion and degradation of natural resources and the environment, ecological processes and biological diversity, the costs of rectifying unmitigated environmental damage, the values of natural resources, capital stocks, the impacts of degradation or improvement, social costs, health costs, environmental clean-up costs, and the costs of the environment, economic growth, and resources uses to current and future generations and to a nationís income.

The measurement of GSDP shows that consumption levels can be maintained without depleting and depreciating the quality and quantity of services. It indicates the solutions to the problems as well as the directions to take, such as:

∑ invest in technology, R & D, to increase the end-use efficiency;
∑ increase productivity;
∑ modify social, educational programs and services;
∑ slow down or increase economic growth;
∑ remediate components of the four major quality systems; and
∑ rectify present shortcomings of income and wealth accounts.

The measurement of GSDP also gives a proper and sound signal to the public, government and industry about the rate and direction of economic growth; it identifies environmental, health, and social quality; it identifies sustainable and unsustainable levels of resource and environmental uses; it measures the success or failure of sustainable development policies and practices; and it identifies resource scarcity. Values obtained enable us to make meaningful comparisons of sustainable development between cities, provinces, nations over the entire planet.

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A Scale of Values for Assessment of the Four Levels of Concerns: Environment, Economic Development, Availability of Resources, as part of GESDI and GSDP

New standards, goals and objectives have to be defined. Firm universal guidelines are essentials in keeping the world healthy. Already we notice new ways of thinking being embraced, new behaviors and attitudes adopted.

The World Congress is also unique because it will establish a:

1. Benchmark for the 21st Century; and
2. Scale of values for assessment.

The scale of values is about establishing what is very important to ensure a sound future for Earth, what is important, what is not so important, and what should be let go. From this scale, agreed upon by all members of The Global Community, the assessment of sustainable development can be conducted. The benchmark is the scale established in year 2000 along with the first evaluation of sustainable development conducted with respect to the four levels.

Our particular approach at the Congress is to emphasize how to best harmonize interacting impacts upon human beings, use of resources, economic growth and environmental needs.

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A unique, more relevant global dialogue on the Management of Global Changes


The raison d'etre of the World Congress and of The Global Community organization is to find sound solutions to sustain Earth in this millennium. New concepts had to be developed and are shown on the website of The Global Community organization:

http://globalcommunitywebnet.com/global2000

The World Congress will bring forward many more new concepts and value systems, Global Ethics, and a Vision of Earth in Year 2024.

One of the most important factors in our lives is the inter-connection we have to others, to other countries. Through these connections you will be able to create changes for good on a global scale.

We must now all become linked to others in faraway places on a much deeper level if we are to work together to keep our planet healthy and productive and hospitable for all people and living things.

As your awareness of this global need deepens you will want to join with others to see that good changes happen.

Right now you can use your skills, your knowledge, your abilities, to realize how your strengths can help bring about the best kind of changes in the world by connecting with us in our aim to promote sustainable development on four major levels: the land, the richness of our land, our economic endeavours and the welfare of all our peoples.

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The Global Community Assessment Centre is part of a unique organization created to better link scientific understanding to effective policy solutions to global changes


GCAC is the assessment Centre serving The Global Community throughout the world. It is a line of call for individuals or organizations seeking information or help about:

(i) Expressing concerns on activities/events happening in his/her community; and
(ii) Searching a sound solution for concerns.

GCAC was created as it reflects our belief that global changes have become challenges for effective policy making. The Centre will help communities prepare to meet these challenges. It will present to The Global Community an annual assessment of the world changes.

The assessment and integration of local/global indicators will be the supporting scientific framework from which new decisions will be made. This knowledge is relevant to the management of global change and will be used for future policy making.

Formal assessments such as those on Climate Change, Human Development Report, World Development Report, struggle for Human Rights, life species Conservation, Health, economic analyses, Biodiversity, Commission on Sustainable Development etc., have bridged the distance between incomplete science and contentious policy. No one really understand what assessment processes have been most effective, or why others have failed. There is a need to train the next generatio of scientists, officials from all levels of government, economists, statisticians, environmentalists, ecologists, renewable and non-renewable resources specialists, business leaders, non-governmental organizations, educators, health and social experts, Aboriginals and Natives, home and community planners, policy analysts, international law specialists, and the public in the skills of collaborating in the future management of global change.

The Centreís goal is to explore how assessment of local/global indicators can better link scientific understanding with the progressive implementation of effective policy solutions to global changes. Achieving this integration is fundamental. The Global Community needs this annual assessment to effectively manage global change.

GCAC is the Centre of assessment of local/global indicators about the four major quality systems: Environment, People, Economic Development and the Availability of Resources. The assessment of these indicators will result in giving The Global Community a sense of direction as to ensure a sound future for Earth. Results are made available to The Global Community.

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